backtop


Print 36 comment(s) - last by Moishe.. on Apr 23 at 4:11 PM


Greenpeace's score sheet  (Source: appleinsider.com)
Apple defended its 20-megawatt North Carolina data center, saying 60 percent of its power comes from renewable energy

Independent environmental organization Greenpeace is in the midst of a disagreement with Apple after giving the tech giant and others like Amazon and Microsoft low Clean Energy Index scores. 

Greenpeace recently released a report called "How Clean is Your Cloud?" which investigates the amount of renewable energy that technology companies used to power data centers and the cloud. Some notable companies that made the list include Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard.

Many companies on the list received lower scores, including Apple. In fact, Apple had the highest percentage for coal dependency out of all the other tech giants at 55.1 percent. It also had a fairly low Clean Energy Index percentage of 15.3 percent compared to others on the list. As far as scores go, Apple received a "D" for energy transparency, an "F" for infrastructure siting, a "D" for energy efficiency and GHG mitigation, and a "D" for renewables and advocacy.

Apple didn't take this sitting down, of course. The gadget maker said the estimates were inaccurate, and supposedly told Greenpeace this back when Apple first saw the original report. Greenpeace said it published the numbers anyway as an attempt to make tech companies' dirty energy use transparent.

"Our data center in North Carolina will draw about 20 megawatts at full capacity, and we are on track to supply more than 60 percent of that power on-site from renewable sources including a solar farm and fuel cell installation which will each be the largest of their kind in the country," said Kristin Huguet, a spokeswoman for Apple. "We believe this industry-leading project will make Maiden the greenest data center ever built, and it will be joined next year by our new facility in Oregon running on 100 percent renewable energy."

Apple opened its 100-acre Maiden, North Carolina data center last spring for iCloud and iTunes support. In previous reports, Apple has said that the 20-megawatt facility would generate about 42 million kWh of clean energy on an annual basis. Next to the data center will be Apple's fuel cell installation, which will be a 5-megawatt facility generating 40 million kWh of 24x7 baseload of renewable energy annually.

Despite Apple's efforts to counter the poor Clean Energy Index score, Greenpeace just wasn't buying it.

"While we welcome Apple's attempt today to provide more specific details on its North Carolina iData Center, it does not appear to have provided the full story, and is instead seeking to provide select pieces of information to make their dirty energy footprint seem smaller," said Greenpeace.

Apple wasn't the only company to complain about its poor score. Amazon reportedly disagreed with Greenpeace's estimates as well, which was a Clean Energy Index percentage of 13.5 percent and 33.9 percent of coal dependency. Amazon received terrible scores, consisting of a "F" for energy transparency, an "F" for infrastructure siting, a "D" for energy efficiency and GHG mitigation, and a "F" for renewables and advocacy.

Other notable mentions on the list include Facebook, with a 36.4 percent Clean Energy Index score, 39.4 percent coal usage, and grades of "D," "B," "B," and "C"; Google, with a 39.4 percent Clean Energy Index score, 28.7 percent coal dependency, and grades of "B," "C," "B," and "A," and Microsoft, with a 13.9 percent Clean Energy Index score, 39.3 percent coal usage, and grades of "C," "D," "C," and "C."

Sources: Greenpeace, Apple Insider



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: I don't get it.
By ritualm on 4/18/2012 6:37:11 PM , Rating: 2
Do you really believe what Sea Shepherd is spoonfeeding you? I don't agree with Japan over its whaling practices, but I also think what SS is doing amounts to terrorism at the same level as Somalia's sea piracy problem that required military ships to escort commercial ships in the first place.

Besides the fact that Paul Watson and their ilk are racist against the Japanese. He publicly praised last year's 3/11 as a "divine wind" punishing Japan.

If you support Sea Shepherd, in some places you can be seen as a terrorist supporter.


RE: I don't get it.
By Reclaimer77 on 4/18/2012 10:36:52 PM , Rating: 2
Didn't he also fake being shot by Japanese fishermen to further his cause? I mean honestly, if you believe your cause is just and you're so righteous, why would you lie like that?

I don't agree with what the Japanese are doing, but come on, going out in a boat with a camera crew and ramming them in international waters seems like more of a publicity stunt than a means to enact change. But I guess it keeps the paychecks coming...


RE: I don't get it.
By loboracing on 4/19/2012 8:34:50 AM , Rating: 2
I used to watch that show because they were the most incompetent seaman I have ever seen, lol. I was in the navy for 8 years and I can not for the life of me figure out how they haven't killed someone or sunk their ship. Every knowledgeable person they get on board leaves the first chance they get after going to sea with those clowns.


RE: I don't get it.
By Reclaimer77 on 4/19/2012 11:50:47 AM , Rating: 4
LOL it's true. I loved the one where they broke every rule of international seamanship and played chicken with a massive research ship from Japan by parking a small boat directly in-front of them and expecting them to go around. The Japanese just rammed their stupid asses, of course, while Suck Sheppard and crew acted mortified like they witnesses a criminal terrorist act. AHAHAHA


"Google fired a shot heard 'round the world, and now a second American company has answered the call to defend the rights of the Chinese people." -- Rep. Christopher H. Smith (R-N.J.)














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki