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A US Representative has called for the ban of Chinese-manufactured computers for classified work, but where will he find such machines?

DailyTech previously reported that the US government had planned to spend roughly $13M USD to buy new computer systems from Lenovo. Some government voices were concerned that because the Chinese government owns a portion of Lenovo, the computer systems would pose a security risk to the US.

Republican Representative Frank Wolf then issued a statement to reporters that no government agency doing classified work should use computers manufacturered by a Chinese company or made outside of the US. However, most computer manufacturers are off-shoring manufacturing works to other countries.

Below is a list of the top dozen or so notebook companies in the US with details on where the components are currently manufactured.

Notebook OEM Quick Reference
Brand
OEM Company
Place of Manufacture
Acer (Taiwan)
ECS-Tatung (Taiwan)
Shenzhen, China
Apple (USA)
Compal (Taiwan)
Hon Hai (Taiwan)
Quanta (Taiwan)
Shenzhen, China
Shanghani, China
Songjiang, China
ASUS (Taiwan)
ASUS (Taiwan)
Suzhou, China
Averatec (USA)
Microstar International (Taiwan)
Kushan, China
Dell (USA)
ASUS (Taiwan)
Compal (Taiwan)
Hon Hai (Taiwan)
Quanta (Taiwan)
Shuzhou, China
Shenzhen, China
Shanghani, China
Songjiang, China
Xiamen, China
Fujitsu (Japan)
Quanta (Taiwan)
Shanghani, China
Songjiang, China
Gateway (USA)
ECS-Tatung (Taiwan)
Quanta (Taiwan)
Shenzhen, China
Shanghani, China
Songjiang, China
Hewlett-Packard (USA)
ASUS (Taiwan)
ECS-Tatung (Taiwan)
Hon Hai (Taiwan)
Quanta (Taiwan)
Suzhou, China
Shenzhen, China
Shanghani, China
Songjiang, China
Lenovo (China)
ECS-Tatung (Taiwan)
Legend (China)
Shanghai, China
Shenzhen, China
Sony (Japan)
Hon Hai (Taiwan)
Shenzhen, China
Toshiba (Japan)
Compal (Taiwan)
Inventec (Taiwan)
Toshiba (Japan)
Shanghai, China
Hangzhou, China

Although virtually all OEM component manufacturers for laptops are based in Taiwan, the factories themselves are located in China.  Just like in the US, it is cheaper to manufacture components in mainland China.  Toshiba, one of the last manufacturing giants in Japan, has even moved its entire notebook manufacturing facilities to China. 

Quanta remained one of the last companies to keep some of its large-scale manufacturing in Taiwan.  However, in 2004 the Quanta facilities in Taiwan were closed in favor of Chinese facilities.  Compal, one of the largest notebook manufactures in the world, prides itself as being one of the first Taiwanese companies to bring its supply and manufacture chain to China.  The last Taiwanese notebook facility closed its doors in September of 2005 when FIC closed its doors for the last time. 
 
Until recently, Taiwanese companies were prevented from owning facilities in mainland China by the Taiwanese government.  To skirt around this issue, almost every manufacturing company sets up factories on the mainland, but each factory is its own private Chinese company.  Even the strong Taiwanese semiconductor foundries are investing in facilities in China, though the Taiwanese government has allowed TSMC to keep its upcoming $900M USD facility under the TSM corporate umbrella.

The fact of the matter is, it is virtually impossible to manufacture PC components these days without components that are made in China.  Even up until last year, it was possible to buy PCs and notebooks that were at least assembled in Taiwan, but even then the mainboards were still constructed in China.  Lenovo may be the only major PC supplier that is a Chinese state-owned enterprise, but considering how closely PC component manufacturers already work in China, it's difficult to single the company out.




"We basically took a look at this situation and said, this is bullshit." -- Newegg Chief Legal Officer Lee Cheng's take on patent troll Soverain
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