backtop


Print 34 comment(s) - last by Wolfpup.. on Apr 16 at 3:18 PM

Aura UI looks a lot like Windows 8 Desktop, will deploy to all Chromebooks except CR-48

Even as Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) heads in bold new directions with its user interface (UI) in the Metro UI powered Windows 8, Google Inc. (GOOG) is looking (unofficially, of course) to the veteran software giant for inspiration.

Google's Chrome OS project has been more or less a flop.  While exact sales numbers are hard to come by, the project was only backed by two manufacturers -- specifically Acer Inc. (TPE:2353) and Samsung Electronics Comp., Ltd. (KS:005930).  Launching mid-summer in 2011, Chrome OS felt buggy and incomplete.  

While it came packaged in a number of nice netbooks, the built-around-the-browser concept was hampered by the inability to connect properly to token-authenticated networks commonly encountered at coffeehouses.  Coupled with poor publicity these issues led Acer to reportedly only sell 5,000 "Chromebooks" (Chrome OS notebooks) in 2011, according to Digitimes.
'
But at CES 2012, Google seemed intent not to give up, working with Samsung to announce new models.

Now a bit more of its plans for a Chrome OS revital have come to light.  Google is freshening up the mobile PC operating system with a fresh taskabar-enabled user interface, complete with a positively Windows-like right hand notification area and pinned program icons in the lower left hand span of the taskbar.

Chrome OS v. Windows 8 Desktop
Chrome's Aura UI looks awfully similar to Windows 8 Desktop.
[Image Source: Google (bottom), Tinkertry (top)]

Like Windows 8's desktop, the new Google UI has a taskbar, but lacks any sort of "Start Menu" so to speak.  Really, Windows 8's desktop and the new Chrome OS UI, dubbed Aura UI, are spitting images of one another.  The only real visual difference is the lack of a shade back to the taskbar in Google's UI.  However, a Windows-like shaded backing to the taskbar is added when Browser Windows are active

Aura UI
Google goes Windows. [Image Source: Google]

Google brags that the new Windows-like interface offers "rich visuals, large-scale animated transitions and effects that can be produced only with the assistance of hardware acceleration" and should "provide the foundation of a flexible windowing system and shell for Chrome and ChromeOS on a variety of form factors."

Aura UI
The program icons are reminiscent of Android or iOS, but lack the cutting edge feel of Metro UI's LIVE Tiles. [Image Source: Google]

The update is currently in the Dev channel and should be rolled out to all Acer and Samsung Chromebooks in the wild shortly.  The early prototype CR-48 Chromebooks, which Google handed out to promote/test the platform, will not be eligible for the UI upgrade as they lack sufficient hardware to support it.  Google clarifies that, "They will continue to receive security and critical updates as necessary."

And it tells CR-48 owners to hang on, stating, "We’ll bring CR-48 devices back onto the release train after this release."


Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Seriously?
By zzebi on 4/10/2012 10:29:24 AM , Rating: -1
Did we seriously get to the point where Google copies Microsoft?




RE: Seriously?
By cigar3tte on 4/10/2012 10:33:23 AM , Rating: 2
Could just say they're copying Mac or Linux, who copied Microsoft. Both Linux and Mac have taskbar at the bottom; what OS doesn't?


RE: Seriously?
By serkol on 4/10/2012 10:33:50 AM , Rating: 5
Stupid Microsoft, they did not patent this. They surely could have patented "a mechanism of influencing the state of operating software programs by means of pointing the user input towards the lower part of the visual user graphic interface device."


RE: Seriously?
By Helbore on 4/10/2012 1:03:50 PM , Rating: 5
They were denied the patent on the grounds that Apple intended to patent the same idea five years later.


RE: Seriously?
By amanojaku on 4/10/2012 11:14:08 AM , Rating: 4
The taskbar (or panel, or dock) can be tracked back as far as 1988, in (Apollo Computer) HP's VUE. Then came OpenGroup's CDE, also with a taskbar, in 1993. Then there's Acorn's Icon Bar in 1987. And don't forget Amiga Workbench in AmigaOS 2.x in 1990.


RE: Seriously?
By WalksTheWalk on 4/10/2012 3:09:45 PM , Rating: 2
In the US, prior art is just a minor fly to be swatted on the road to patent-ville.

I say everyone should apply for anything possible so everything will be patented and we can sue ourselves into oblivion.

Soon I will be patenting a design for a machine which will move people and products around streets and cities using a self-contained power source and internal fuel receptacle. This machine will be a slightly different size that any existing machines using the same design so it should go right through the USPTO for approval.

</sarc>


RE: Seriously?
By Obujuwami on 4/10/2012 11:46:30 AM , Rating: 2
Actually, everyone copied Xerox's design when it was at PARC. This is why Apple and Microsoft pay MILLIONS to Xerox every year and it's never acknowledged.

As for Google, they need to do something with their OS. Android won't work well to a desktop/laptop environment and they will still need to learn the lessons that Microsoft learned between 1998 and 2006, which is what Apple is learning now. It would be nice to see a 3rd party in the desktop OS realm as competition will breed innovation...I hope...


RE: Seriously?
By ajcarroll on 4/10/2012 12:59:20 PM , Rating: 2
Obujuwami, not disputing that Mac was inspired by Xerox Star, but in terms of licensing, Xerox lost big time when they sued apple in the late 80's, and I'm not aware of them earning any substantial royalties for windowing system.

Xerox's lawsuit vs Apple was interesting, in addition to claiming apple infringed on their copyright (which they lost) they also tried to have apple's copyright on the Mac look and feel declared void, on the grounds that apple's ownership of the Mac IP made it harder for Xerox to successfully license their IP to other computer makers; in addition they tried to get apple's copyrights declared void on procedural grounds surrounding how apple registered their work with trademark and copyright office. Both of these claims were dismissed on the grounds that there is utterly not legal standing to make such a claim.

Despite all their groundbreaking work with the Star Workstation, Xerox Parc earns very little if any licensing royalties from apple or microsoft for windowing operating systems. They may earn stuff for other patents.


RE: Seriously?
By zephyrprime on 4/10/2012 2:58:40 PM , Rating: 2
It's been more than thirty years since windowing and the gui was invented so I think royalty payments would no longer be necessary. The patents probably expired when the number of computers in the field was probably a small fraction of what they are now.


RE: Seriously?
By tayb on 4/10/2012 11:04:24 AM , Rating: 2
Google copies Microsoft just as often as Microsoft copies Google. The side swiping on the youtube Android app screams "Zune UI" and the Google Play store is laid out almost EXACTLY like the Metro UI. There is nothing wrong with this. If you see a good UI idea, you use it. It would be dumb not to.


RE: Seriously?
By WalksTheWalk on 4/10/2012 3:12:45 PM , Rating: 2
Except that Apple owns a patent for swipe gestures so they both will be sued into submission.

Yea for broad brush software patents.

</sarc>


"I want people to see my movies in the best formats possible. For [Paramount] to deny people who have Blu-ray sucks!" -- Movie Director Michael Bay














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki