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David Fluri  (Source: daylife.com)
The new suspension method allows stem cells to be collected in larger numbers instead of being scraped off of a surface

Researchers from the University of Toronto's Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) have created a new method for growing stem cells in larger quantities.

David Fluri, a postdoctoral researcher at IBBME, and Peter Zandstra, a professor at IBBME, have developed a new suspension method for growing stem cells, which allows for the collection of greater numbers of stem cells and increases the chance of obtaining viable cells in a cost-effective way.

Traditionally, stem cells are grown on surfaces that need to be scraped and are then differentiated from other kinds of cells to avoid cell death. However, this method doesn't produce enough viable stem cells from each culture, and the high cost to use this method doesn't match the results.

But now, Fluri and Zandstra have combined the stem cell creation process with a bioreactor, which provides stable environments for such processes. The cells were also grown in suspension, making the process more stable and safer for more viable cells.

By doing this, mouse cells were reprogrammed into pluripotent stem cells, which can become any kind of cell. They were then changed into cardiac cells.

Fluri and Zandstra hope that this new technique can be used to eventually treat heart disease. It is designed to work with large scale processes and provide the quantity needed for successful stem cell research and drug development.

"This is an enabling technology," said Zandstra. "It takes something we showed we could do before at low efficiency but not at such numbers that could be used in manufacturing."

Source: Eurekalert



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RE: This could have been the US
By Asetha on 4/11/2012 12:38:36 AM , Rating: 2
"Also, the way you quoted the Bible's "inaccuracies" tells me that you regard it highly. Any such person is automatically disqualified from being a rational and reasonable person."

About as irrational as Newton and Galileo?


RE: This could have been the US
By corduroygt on 4/11/2012 1:15:49 AM , Rating: 1
1. A seed is not a plant, therefore a blastocyst is not a human, simple case really. The beginning of a human != human.

2. Religious beliefs have to be evaluated within the context of the period of one's existence. If Newton and Galileo lived today, they would easily reject all religious beliefs, and most likely even the concept of a God. Anyone who does not reject any and all organized religion in 2012 is a bone fide idiot and there is no disputing it. Only acceptable action is to have philosophical arguments about the existence of a creator, and not the Bible or any other religious texts, which are all equally horseshit.


RE: This could have been the US
By Asetha on 4/15/2012 1:11:54 AM , Rating: 2
1. It has it's own unique DNA, even when it is a single cell. There is zero difference between a single-celled human and yourself other than a certain amount of time. I find killing toddlers abhorrent, and for the exact same reason I find killing single-celled humans abhorrent. Human life is precious.

2. Pure speculation. You are claiming that Newton etc. didn't critically think about their faith positions, which they would likely find highly insulting. Then you devolve into ad-hominem attacks, a favorite logical fallacy of (though not exclusive to)the rabid atheist crowd. People who don't believe that the universe caused itself to exist before it did, and there are an infinite number of unmeasurable, unobservable and untestable other universes (which is, by definition, unscientific!) and life spawned itself, along with reason, and that natural selection explains all human behavior and thought (including the beliefs of those you disagree with, so why call them idiots?) are stupid and should be silenced.


RE: This could have been the US
By Asetha on 4/15/2012 1:13:01 AM , Rating: 2
Also, nice dodge. You conveniently ignored every single embryology text that states a blastocyst = an individual human.


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