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  (Source: themeparkreview.com)
Rose Gottemoeller said the next generation will change how cyber defense is handled

A U.S. government official said that cyber defense has been slow-moving due to the current generation of policymaker's lack of technological understanding.

Rose Gottemoeller, U.S. Acting Undersecretary for Arms Control and International Security, recently visited the Estonian IT College in Tallinn to deliver a speech about cyber attacks and defense. In this lecture, she noted that a major issue with current cyber defense is the fact that many policymakers around the world don't fully understand technology used today.

"The truth is there are a lot of senior officials in many countries who barely even know how to use an email," said Gottemoeller. "The change will come with the new generation."

Gottemoeller also mentioned that open-source IT and social networking should be integrated into arms control verification.

"In order to pursue the goal of a world free from nuclear weapons, we are going to have to think bigger and bolder," said Gottemoeller. "New concepts are not invented overnight, and we don't understand the full range of possibilities inherent in the information age, but we would be remiss if we did not start thinking about whether new technologies can augment over half a century of arms control negotiating expertise."

Cyber defense has been placed under the spotlight now more than ever with threats recently directed toward both government and corporate entities. Last year, a string of attacks pinpointed many victims like Sony, Bank of America, the Department of Justice, Lockheed Martin, and many more.

Many U.S. officials have called for more cyber defense transparency in the recent past between the government and private sector, where one could help the other and vice versa. For instance, both former CIA/NSA head Michael Hayden and ex-Marine Corps General James Cartwright agreed that cyber security threats are overclassified.

Source: Defense News



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RE: Current generation of people lack understanding
By TSS on 4/3/2012 7:47:24 PM , Rating: 1
I shudder what will happen when the new generation comes into power. I was on the end of the last generation (born in 1987) and i've seen the switch. When i was in highschool, i did the highest level but had to do my 2nd freshmen year again. From my first year, only 3 (including me and i simply didn't put in any effort) failed and had to do the year over, the other 2 opting to just stream ahead into a lower level. This was pretty much average each year up to that point.

The next year, a whopping 9 out of 21 kids failed that level and streamed to a lower level.

I saw it again in college. The end of my 3rd year when carrying over a project to the next students. While our class was a rowdy bunch, not taking out notebooks and basically always complaining about the abysmal state of the education we where getting, the next year students (already in the classroom when we entered) where all sitting neatly at tables, notebooks open, pens at the ready. Like they where actually going to learn usefull information. The teachers commented earlyer on in that year how the new class was such a difference from us and listened and wrote things down. In their words, it was "almost scary".

Problem is though, everything you learned at that education was total and utter crap. Out of 4 years, i remembered 5 tricks in how to do things that i didn't teach myself, i applied all 5 in business and all 5 where wrong. Everything else was so wrong or out of date i didn't bother to remember. For god saskes i spent 2003 till februari 2006 doing windows 98 and windows NT! And these kids where gobbling it all up like it was the definitive word. No talkback, no critizism, no creative thinking. Just did what they where told.

I did visit my school a couple of years later and inquired about the project we had left behind. When we got it, it was basically a shoddy student run service desk without even a own classroom. When i left it, it was fully up and running with plans to take over the IT education's network, start a hardware division and make money off of it involving lower level educations and a external department where students could go on assignments for the school and make some extra money for the budget to update outdated machines. The plan for it was all written out and i left it with them (200 pages of it, condensed).

The first year had done reasonably well (appearantly, they had followed the plan). After the 2nd year however, the entire project crashed, the students failed to do anything with it and by the end of the year it had ceased to exist.

I have no clue what happened, or who is to blame, or how to fix this (the generation thing i mean). All i know is, it's going to be epic fail.


By Crazyeyeskillah on 4/4/2012 11:29:31 AM , Rating: 2
I honestly can't understand a word of what you are saying TSS. None of the sentences seem to really be logical. I understand if English is your second (or more) language but this is just boggling. Could you just sum it up in a few less words so that we can add it to the discussion?


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