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Print 44 comment(s) - last by Dan Banana.. on Apr 7 at 9:20 PM

Fusion to be the first non-hybrid mid-size to offer start-stop

The amount of research and development automakers are put into saving even the smallest amounts of fuel are impressive. The research is also necessary if automakers are to meet much more stringent CAFE standards moving forward. One of the technologies that will help automakers meet those fuel economy standards is start-stop technology.
 
Originally, start-stop technology was used on hybrid vehicles to allow them to save fuel while stopped at red lights or in traffic. The technology is now spilling over into traditional vehicles to help them save fuel. Ford will offer start-start technology as an option on the 2013 Fusion when equipped with the 1.6-liter EcoBoost engine. The technology will be dirt cheap, meaning that it's likely to be ordered on many of the vehicles that hit streets. Ford has price the start-stop option at $295.
 
Ford says that the new fusion is the first midsize sedan available with automatic start-stop that isn't a hybrid. Just as the technology works on a hybrid vehicle, when the Fusion driver comes to a complete stop the engine will turn off automatically to cut fuel consumption and reduce emissions. When the driver releases the brake pedal, the engine will automatically restart and be ready to move by time the gas pedal is pressed. 
 
2013 Ford Fusion family [Source: Ford]

“We expect the average Fusion driver with the 1.6-liter EcoBoost engine and Auto Start-Stop will save about $1,100 more than other midsize sedan owners during five years of driving,” said Samantha Hoyt, Ford Fusion Marketing Manager. “That’s cash in their pocket and time saved with fewer trips to the pump.”
 
Ford says that drivers who operate the vehicle in heavy urban areas and in city traffic will see up to 10% savings on fuel consumption. The average driver will see an increase in fuel efficiency of about 3.5%. As long as the technology is truly seamless and there is no hesitation between the engine stop and engine start, the majority of drivers will never notice the technology in operation.

The new 2013 Ford Fusion will go on sale this fall and will offer two different EcoBoost all engines. The Fusion will also be offered in hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and naturally aspirated four-cylinder versions.

Source: Ford



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RE: OK
By Keeir on 4/2/2012 3:32:08 PM , Rating: 2
Any tech isn't automatically less pollution. One of the requirements of this technology is a heavier/sturdier starter. This adds wieght to the car (increasing fuel burn) and requires more materials to be mined, refined, and formed.

Now, if only there was a way to estimate the pollution/waste caused by these features?

Oh wait, energy use is typically porportional to cost. If something costs less, it likely uses less energy and then likely pollutes less. If something costs more, it likely uses more energy and then likely pollutes more.

For example, if I bought a Prius and drove 3,000 miles a year, instead of being enviromental, I am being quite the reverse. I required significant pollution of the enviroment to create a fuel savings technology I am not taking advantage off... that's easy example.

For this start and stop, I personally don't idle very much. In a typical day I may hit 2 red lights for a total ~90 seconds idling. Do I save enough fuel to justify the extra pollution of the the technology? That's a legitimate question I think...


RE: OK
By 0ldman on 4/3/2012 10:55:56 AM , Rating: 2
Never mind the initial start up is *not* a clean, complete burn. It can't be. Stop and go traffic, this will actually make it worse. Less fuel consumed, a lot nastier exhaust.

If you care to argue, just go near your exhaust just after it starts up, hot or cold, and take a deep breath.

There will certainly be adjustments made to allow for this, but it will only help in perfect situations. I don't stop enough on the road for this to matter. Large city traffic will probably cause the emissions to be worse unless Ford makes the car run for a certain period of time before it shuts down again.

I am still waiting for lead/acid batteries to start being an issue. You will go through batteries faster with this technology.

I can see it on a hybrid. On a pure gas burner... doh...


RE: OK
By Dan Banana on 4/7/2012 9:20:05 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
For example, if I bought a Prius and drove 3,000 miles a year, instead of being enviromental, I am being quite the reverse. I required significant pollution of the enviroment to create a fuel savings technology I am not taking advantage off... that's easy example. For this start and stop, I personally don't idle very much. In a typical day I may hit 2 red lights for a total ~90 seconds idling. Do I save enough fuel to justify the extra pollution of the the technology? That's a legitimate question I think...


You really exhibit some bizarre situational logic to try to fit reality into your preconceived notions. Obviously if someone is driving 3000 miles per year versus 20,000 miles per year they are creating far less CO2.


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