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The tiny compounds could eventually help diabetics...like Paula Deen  (Source: nutrivize.com)
The pair of tiny molecules caused a decrease in cholesterol and fat mass

Researchers at the Scripps Research Institute in Florida have developed a pair of molecules that could lead to weight loss and one day treat disorders like obesity and diabetes.
 
Thomas Burris, study leader and a professor at Scripps Florida, along with a team of researchers, were able to synthesize a pair of tiny molecules that are capable of altering the biological clock in animals.
 
The small molecules alter the circadian rhythm and pattern of core clock gene expression in the brain’s hypothalamus. Circadian rhythms react to a 24-hour cycle of light and dark while the brain’s hypothalamus relates to the daily rhythms in mammals.
 
The synthetic compounds activate proteins called REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, which are partially responsible for the biological rhythms associated with metabolism in mammals.
 
The researchers administered the synthetic compounds to obese mice twice a day for 12 days. After the 12 days, researchers tested the mice and found that fat mass, hyperglycemia, and cholesterol levels improved significantly. The mice were given a diet of high fat and high sugar foods, yet still lost weight.
 
According to the study’s results, cholesterol was reduced by 47 percent and triglycerides in the blood decreased by 12 percent.
 
The compounds also played a part in controlling the mammals’ activity during night and day, which the researchers believe could be used to control insomnia and other sleep disorders. Researchers found that oxygen consumption increased by 5 percent in mice during the day and night, which means increased energy expenditure, but they found that these increases were not due to increased energy – there was a 15 percent decrease in movement during the same time that oxygen consumption increased.
 
“The idea behind this research is that our circadian rhythms are coupled with metabolic processes and that you can modulate them pharmacologically,” said Burris. “As it turns out, the effect of that modulation is surprisingly positive – everything has been beneficial so far.”
 
This study was published in Nature.

Source: Science Daily



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By geddarkstorm on 3/30/2012 5:52:09 PM , Rating: 2
Their data showed both significantly lowered body fat and lower blood sugar in tandem. The two are generally linked, though as you said, not always. There are other ways to short the system.

Most likely these upregulated clocks are stimulating a large release of some hormone that's activating brown fat production and higher metabolism (the type that keeps us warm, especially as we sleep), so I would expect as you said that body temperature probably rose some. Could also be a lot of the sugar and fat was simply converted into waste products, and not directly burned.

Be very interesting to see how this develops. To think the circadian system had such a potent phenotype over fat and glucose levels is profound.

What people are starting to learn is that calories are not a number game to biological systems. Counting calories means nothing except at the extreme ends of the range. For instance, mice on a 40% calorie restriction diet actually take in more calories per pound of body weight versus mice on a normal diet--and yet they are slimmer, fitter, live significantly longer and healthier. It's a paradox.

The key is that chemical balancing act. There are so many concentration dependent and -gradients of concentrations- dependent activities and gene regulations in our bodies, it's mind boggling. But if we can figure out how to slip the body's gene expression profiles into calorie restriction mode, that would do wonders for people's health regardless of diet.


By JediJeb on 3/31/2012 10:43:19 PM , Rating: 1
Yes it is amazing how complex the human body is. I also remember my great uncle who was about 5'7" and weighed maybe 100 pounds, walked 3 to 5 miles most days, worked on a farm most of his life, ate like a bird and still had Type II diabetes, and yet most of the commentators in the other thread know so much about biochemistry they solve the problem with "Duh, just eat less and you will be healthy". If only it was so simple.


By BernardP on 4/2/2012 11:27:19 AM , Rating: 2
The final word about insulin, obesity and diabetes. Gary Taubes: Good Calories, Bad Calories:

http://tinyurl.com/cops8bu


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