backtop


Print 48 comment(s) - last by ShoePuke.. on Apr 12 at 10:46 AM

New premium SUV is packed with Ford's high-tech features, options

The beloved SUV is finally starting to shed its "gas guzzler" distinction, thanks to vehicles like the new 2013 Explorer SUV from Ford Motor Comp. (F).  Ford unveiled this morning its upgraded model, which brings a new marquee submodel, the Ford Explorer Sport.

Ford has been putting a lot of pressure on fellow automakers with its premium package consumer vehicles, which often offer features sets that are quite competitive with its rivals' luxury brand vehicles.

The Explorer Sport has been empowered with Ford's twin-turbocharged, gasoline direct injection (GDI) equipped "Ecoboost" branded V6 engine, which previously popped up in the 2010 Ford Taurus SHO, the 2010 Ford Flex, the 2011 F-150, and a pair of Lincoln branded vehicles (the MKS and MKT).

Ford did not list the exact horespower of its latest tuned Ecoboost V6, but it's expected to deliver over 350 hp, while offering up 16 mpg city, 25 mpg highway.  

Ford Explorer

Ford says that's anticipated to be 3/2 mpg better (city/highway, respectively) than Chrysler's Jeep Grand Cherokee and Dodge Durango R/T with 5.7L Hemi engines, and 3/4 mpg better than the Land Rover Range Rover Sport (Land Rover is a Tata Motor Comp. (BSE:500570) subsidiary previously owned by Ford).

Aside from beating its rivals by double digit percentages in the fuel economy department, the new SUV is rated to tow up to 5,000 pounds.

Ford Explorer 2

The model also comes with special new trim and the rejuvenated distribution of MyFord Touch, which was added to the base Explorer model in 2011.  The vehicle also has a high-tech set of options, which include Active Park Assist (APS), Blind Spot Information System (BLIS), and Push Button Start.

In July of last year, Ford introduced a "lesser" four-cylinder EcoBoost version of the Explorer.

Source: Ford



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: This is good?
By chucky2 on 3/29/2012 6:43:23 PM , Rating: 2
The EPA can factor basically everyone on the highway doing 65 miles an hour - at least - and in most cases, more like 70 mph or 80 mph. Their highway numbers suck for accuracy. I don't drive enough city to know if those are as inaccurate as well, but, given how inaccurate their highway numbers are, I've got to think city is just as screwed up.

It's great that numbers can be compared, it really is. And the almost totally clueless public can have a really easy go of it. Too bad they're comparing meaningless number A to meaningless number B, but then factoring that meaningless result into a very meaningful decision. If the window sticker had in big bold red words 'These numbers are totally inaccurate because of our F'd up test protocol, don't even bother using them to base your purchase decisio on', I could see maybe arguing the EPA numbers were somewhat useful.

They're not.

Pretending they're useful in any relevant way when comparing gas vs. diesel is even more insane.

The EPA could actually solve this by breaking their city/highway into a 5 group number system, and then designing Realistic test protocols around each of those five groups. But then, people would actually know that their gas Explorer gets 6 mpg in stop and go traffic. And we can't have that...


RE: This is good?
By PoikilothermicX on 4/2/2012 7:11:44 PM , Rating: 2
If you go to the fueleconomy.gov site you will actually see ACTUAL mileage beside EPA mileage.

The current EPA testing methodology is biased against diesels but benefits hybrids. There are many reasons for this the biggest is you have 2 totally different technologies who excel at very different things. Real world city mileage sucks ass. Unless you have a hybrid or something with start/stop I really don't care what you drive cause it will suck. This morning on my way to work I got 35mpg (according to my cluster) but on Friday I got 19.5mpg. This morning I didn't hit any lights but Friday I spent more time idling than I did actually moving.

Hybrids excel in town. They tend to not be so great on the highway because they have high weight and low power (given their size... Prius... Corolla size, Yaris engine, Camry weight...) while diesels have better weight (tho it's becoming a problem due to all the added emissions equipment) and really excel on the highway as their torque allows them to just cruise down the highway without breaking a sweat.


"If a man really wants to make a million dollars, the best way would be to start his own religion." -- Scientology founder L. Ron. Hubbard














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki