backtop


Print 29 comment(s) - last by Dan Banana.. on Mar 5 at 9:01 PM

Wireless charging technology uses magnetic induction

Several things need to happen before the electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid becomes common on the mainstream auto market. These vehicles need a longer driving range, the technology needs to come down in price, and changes in how the vehicles charge are needed. Namely, the charging would ideally be done without wires so the driver wouldn’t have to remember to plug in when they get home.
 
Audi is working on wireless charging technology using WiTricity technology. Audi is rather mum on the details of its wireless charging initiative, so we only have a general overview of what it has in mind. With the system, power is transferred from an inductive charging point to the vehicle using a magnetic field when the vehicle is in the proper charging position.
 
This technology would allow the driver to simply pull into their garage or driveway and charging would automatically start. The system uses two WiTricity coils with one in the parking lot (or driveway/garage) and another integrated into the car’s charging system. Power would be transferred between those two coils to charge the vehicle batteries.


Audi e-tron Spyder Concept
 
Project Leader Dr. Björn Elias says, "We aim to offer our customers a premium-standard recharging method – easy to use and fully automatic, with no mechanical contacts. It uses the induction principle, which is already well known from various products, from the electric toothbrush through the induction cooker hotplate. We are now using it to recharge cars."
 
The primary coil would be located in the garage or in the driveway, and could be placed beneath a surface like concrete or asphalt. It would not be affected by rain, ice, or snow and there's no risk of shock to humans or animals.
 
Audi envisions a future where the charging coils are integrated into surfaces such as home driveways or parking spots in parking garages.
 
Dr. Elias outlines a medium-term scenario, "Imagine you drive to work in your Audi e-tron, and on the way home you stop off at the store. Wherever you park the car, its battery will be recharged – perhaps even at traffic signals. These short recharging cycles are ideal for the battery: the smaller the difference between the values before and after recharging, the longer the battery's potential operating life."

Source: Autoblog Green



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Uh-huh.
By Reclaimer77 on 3/2/2012 3:29:31 PM , Rating: -1
Talk about putting the cart before the horse lol. Audi should be trying to figure out how to make an electric car people actually want to buy. Not some exotic charging systems for them.


"And boy have we patented it!" -- Steve Jobs, Macworld 2007

Related Articles
Audi e-tron E1 Concept Spied in Berlin
August 11, 2011, 2:34 PM













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki