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Print 44 comment(s) - last by nafhan.. on Feb 29 at 10:36 AM

German court rules Apple's FRAND licensing proposal is fair enough, would be illegal for Motorola to refuse

Sources: FOSS Patents [1], [2]





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RE: So...
By Tony Swash on 2/28/2012 6:56:42 PM , Rating: 0
quote:
Because this is how everything has worked in software and science and technology for all of history; it's what Apple DOES, and it's how progress happens. The real question is why shouldn't copying be allowed?


I think you may be confusing different things. 'Copying' and 'building on'

In one scenario a company makes a new sort of smart phone that you can email on, surf the web, watch movies, listen to music, manage your photo collection and do it all through a touch interface. It's hugely successful. It's competitors say 'that looks great, obviously all phones are going be like this soon, let's see if we can make our own smart phone using a touch interface'. So they beaver away and come up with their own smart phone design. Let's call this scenario Windows Phone 7.

In another scenario a company makes a new sort of smart phone that you can email on, surf the web, watch movies, listen to music, manage your photo collection and do it all through a touch interface. It's hugely successful. It's competitors say 'that looks great, obviously all phones are going be like this soon, lets copy this smart phone as closely as we can and make out version look just like the first one'. Let's call this scenario Android.

One is all about innovation, taking what came before, being inspired and informed by it, seeing the possibilities it revealed, and then coming up with something distinct and new. This is innovation. The second scenario, the 'me too' product, contributes little or nothing, is not innovative and when pursued with too much enthusiasm constitutes a sort of theft.

quote:
Agreed, but the outcome will have far reaching implications in technology and IP law for decades (essentially all aspects of you and your hypothetical children's lives). So, that outcome is very important, to me, at least.


I think you are over egging your argument. Almost all big waves of innovation involve legal conflicts like this as the inflection point of fundamental change is reached. Then everyone moves on and the whole things is forgotten. Who now can recount the intricate dance of legal cases that developed with the rise of the PC?

All this will have blown over in a few years and be forgotten.


RE: So...
By nafhan on 2/29/2012 10:36:27 AM , Rating: 2
Where do you come up with this stuff? The first step in "building on" something is to copy it. Otherwise, you're not building on anything...


"If they're going to pirate somebody, we want it to be us rather than somebody else." -- Microsoft Business Group President Jeff Raikes










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