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Tesla Model X electric SUV crossover vehicle
It was also the third most searched term on Google

Just last week, Tesla Motors revealed the all-electric Model X crossover, which is the follow-up to its Model S. It has been less than a week since the EV's introduction, and it has already achieved star status with car lovers everywhere.

According to The Detroit News, Tesla received $40 million in pre-sales of the all-electric Model X just one day after unveiling the car. It was also the third most searched term on Google.

"On Thursday evening, the night of the reveal, traffic to teslamotors.com increased 2,800 percent," said Tesla. "Two-thirds of all visitors were new to the website."

The all-electric Model X was introduced for the first time on February 9. The new EV features dual motor all wheel drive, the choice between a 60 or 85 kWh battery, and falcon doors. The Model X can sprint from 0 to 60 in about 4.4 seconds, and offers a rear-mounted 300 HP motor and an optional 150 HP front-mounted motor. The driving range is between 214 and 267 miles.

Price hasn't been announced for the Model X yet, but Tesla said it will be competitively priced with other premium SUVs.

While the Model X has been receiving plenty of attention, it's not the only one. The Model S, which is Tesla's full-sized battery electric sedan that is expected to be delivered in mid 2012, had a 30 percent boost in reservations last week after the Model X was revealed.

Tesla initially entered the electric vehicle arena with the Roadster, which is a $100,000 two-seater that launched in 2008. The Model S is Tesla's second electric vehicle, which features a 40 kWh lithium-ion battery pack (or 85 kWh battery pack in the top-end model), 160-mile range (300 miles on the top-end model), and a $57,400 to $87,400 price tag.

Model X production will begin at the end of 2013, with market launch scheduled for 2014. It is expected to qualify for the $7,500 tax credit, and Tesla hopes to produce 10,000 to 15,000 units annually.

Sources: SlashGear, The Detroit News



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RE: interesting
By tayb on 2/15/2012 2:27:29 PM , Rating: 0
He is incapable of any meaningful discussion on any subject without resorting to idiocy, name-calling, and other childish retorts. He doesn't understand what an opinion is or the idea that someone else may have a different opinion than his own. Further, he is wholly convinced that his opinion is not only vastly superior in every way but anyone with a different opinion is not only wrong but an ignorant, moronic, fool.

His stances would be perfectly acceptable in their own right because, after all, everyone is welcome to his or her own opinion but I don't know where, when, or how he got this hilarious/sad/ridiculous superiority complex.

Oh mighty Reclaimer please show me thy ways. Your way is the only way. No other way be possible.


RE: interesting
By Keeir on 2/15/2012 2:51:47 PM , Rating: 2
Sorry tayb, your nearly as bad. (Though you rarely resort to name calling)

You often utter completely bizare statement without even some rationale. Take the "No benefit from Human Space flight"

Considering the dozens of inventions that are in part or in whole dervived past from efforts in human spaceflight, its just not believable that you would recieve "no" as in zero benefit from future efforts.

Now, could I agree that in principle Human Space flight at for the forseeable future provides less benefit for the same cost as robotic exploration... sure. Could I agree that you do not vew the few benefits in your life due past human space flight as worth the billions used to produce them... well... thats an arguable point, but at least its an opinion based in reality that we could both provide examples and data in support of either position.


RE: interesting
By tayb on 2/15/2012 3:28:52 PM , Rating: 2
Some of the best inventions from the space program would have been discovered in their own right in due time or would have been found regardless replacing humans with robots. Advances in plastics, scratch proof glasses, memory foam, thermometers, communications, and battery tech (ironic) just to name a few would have most likely been discovered in their own right. This doesn't include "global prowess" that most people claim as a benefit as well.

I could definitely do a much better job qualifying my statements but they are rarely without rationale. The idea that advancing EV technology is a waste but human spaceflight is not is silly.


RE: interesting
By Reclaimer77 on 2/15/2012 3:42:26 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Some of the best inventions from the space program would have been discovered in their own right in due time


Okay I'll play that game. Why can't EV's eventually hit the market in their own right, in due time, without the subsidies and CAFE pressure?

Also you're flat out wrong on space flight and advancements that came out of it. I know you live with your mother still, hasn't she ever told you "necessity is the mother of invention"?

There would be no reason for those technologies to advance at the rate they did if they did not HAVE to be invented. End of discussion.


RE: interesting
By Keeir on 2/15/2012 3:45:01 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
Some of the best inventions from the space program would have been discovered in their own right in due time or would have been found regardless replacing humans with robots. Advances in plastics, scratch proof glasses, memory foam, thermometers, communications, and battery tech (ironic) just to name a few would have most likely been discovered in their own right


Maybe, maybe not. I think thats a really tough position to take... that inventions sought specifically for a goal would have occured -at nearly the same time- without the goal. I'd like to see some evidence that research teams, independant of the space program, were make similiar progress. I am not aware of any such data.

quote:
The idea that advancing EV technology is a waste but human spaceflight is not is silly.


You took Reclaimer out of context. He didn't say EV technology was more wasteful than spaceflight (although its a reasonable guess he feels that way), he said funding Tesla EVs is more wasteful than funding SpaceX. Which I think is pretty true. Providing a 10% or less discount on future garage queens does seem less useful than funding research and testing into launch capacities (for both human and robotic missions) to space. Now, if Tesla was producing a mass market sedan in the 30,000-40,000 price range that was going to be driven 10,000-15,000 miles a year, the equation might become different. But thats not the case. Tesla's customers are benefiting from an unneeded 7,500 at a time when our Federal Government is overspending and people have difficulty finding work. Nor does Tesla seem intent on producing that mass market sedan (apparently the Model X is more important).


RE: interesting
By The Raven on 2/16/2012 1:08:54 PM , Rating: 2
I think this whole string of replies illustrates exactly why the gov't shouldn't be involved at all in either space flight (of course unless there is a credible defense issue), EVs or much anything else.

It would be nice to jump in Doc Brown's Delorean, go back in time and rip this idea of gov't subsidies from the national consciousness and then watch all of these comments (hateful and otherwise) disappear.

The conversation would continue as how we progress on each front, but only where people are open to the ideas instead of having them shoved down their throats (i.e. funded out of their pockets).


RE: interesting
By Raraniel on 2/15/2012 4:56:34 PM , Rating: 2
Once again I feel xkcd has a quote which appropriately sums up the ultimate benefit of manned spaceflight.

"the universe is probably littered with the one-planet graves of cultures which made the sensible economic decision that there's no good reason to go into space -- each discovered, studied, and remembered by the ones who made the irrational decision."


"When an individual makes a copy of a song for himself, I suppose we can say he stole a song." -- Sony BMG attorney Jennifer Pariser














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