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Suddenly the class action settlement doesn't look so good

San Diego County Superior Court Judge Timothy Taylor granted five states -- including California and Texas -- more time for the consideration of whether or not the states will object of class action settlement between Honda and owners of some of the automakers hybrid vehicles. The interest of at least one of the states was piqued when Heather Peters was recently awarded $9867 in small claims court. That case will certainly be appealed by Honda.
 
Peters took Honda to small claims court alleging that Honda had misled owners of the Civic Hybrid by using fuel economy numbers in their marketing that were unattainable in the real world. Peters took the small claims court because Honda would be barred from bringing attorneys to fight.
 
The five states that have asked for more time to consider objecting to a proposed class-action suit that Peters opted out of include California, Iowa, Massachusetts, Texas, and Washington.
 
The proposed class-action settlement between Honda and owners of some of its hybrid vehicles would see each member of the class getting a few hundred dollars and up to $1500 in rebates towards purchase of a new Honda. It would seem that the states are considering an objection because the settlement is clearly not as good as what Peters won in small claims court.
 
While Judge Taylor granted the states the extra time requested to consider objecting, he did chastise the states for not objecting until a couple of days before the deadline when other states were able to enter their objections early.
 
Judge Taylor said, "They managed to get theirs in on time. I don't see why you can't."
 
California Deputy Attorney General Albert Sheldon said it meant that the victory won by Peters in small claims court in Los Angeles caught their attention.

Source: Detroit News



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All three of my honda's failed to meet sticker MPG
By Lord 666 on 2/16/2012 10:37:27 AM , Rating: 2
1998 Civic HX 5 speed - Sticker was 36/44 and never got over high 30's on exclusive highway driving.

2002 Accord V6 auto - Sticker was 20/28 with the acutal being lower. Noticed transmission issues the second week I bought it, but Honda didn't find anything. When it finally failed after the warranty expired around 60,000 miles, they comp'd the transmission, but I paid for labor. The transmission went again, but after I sold it to a buddy with 160,000 miles.

2005 CRV AWD - Sticker was 22/26 with the actual being lower. Biggest PoS ever owned

All of the vehicles were purchased new. Have since moved away from Honda.




By Marlin1975 on 2/16/2012 10:50:00 AM , Rating: 2
Could be the area you live in. In higher climate places that are not flat its harder on a car (air and angle). Let alone driving habits if you came from a V8/V6 car to a 4cyl you may drive harder for the same performance.

In this case the Civic Hybrid had issues. The batteries were buring out and costing Honda a lot of money. So they "upgraded" the computer and the batteries lasted longer but the gas milage dropped a lot.


By Just Tom on 2/16/2012 12:58:43 PM , Rating: 2
The lemon law states that the seller would have to refund the full cost of the car which is significantly less than what she recieved.


By Marlin1975 on 2/16/2012 1:41:43 PM , Rating: 2
Stop posting on stuff you have no idea about, so in other words just stop posting.

"The "Lemon Law" applies to these problems if they arise during the first 18 months after the consumer received delivery of the vehicle or within the first 18,000 miles on the odometer."

RTFA


By Just Tom on 2/16/2012 4:09:08 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Stop posting on stuff you have no idea about, so in other words just stop posting.

"The "Lemon Law" applies to these problems if they arise during the first 18 months after the consumer received delivery of the vehicle or within the first 18,000 miles on the odometer."


Take your own advice. The California lemon law is applicable within the written warranty period. So if your warranty is 3 years it is good for 3 years.

From the California Office of the Attorney General website.

quote:
The law applies for the entire period of your warranty. For example, if your vehicle is covered by a three-year warranty and you discover a defect after two years, the manufacturer will have to replace the vehicle or reimburse you as outlined above if the manufacturer or its representative is unable to conform the vehicle to the express warranty after a reasonable number of attempts to do so.


http://oag.ca.gov/consumers/general/lemon


By Marlin1975 on 2/17/2012 7:27:34 AM , Rating: 2
RTFA

Her car a "2006 Honda Civic".

What lemon law covers a car 6 years later? Also what would the defect be? Bad gas milage is a sympton, not a replacable part.


By Just Tom on 2/17/2012 9:22:43 AM , Rating: 1
I read the article, I also read your comment which I will repeat since you have short term memory loss. I never stated that the car should be covered by the lemon law, I replied to your post with made up information.

quote:
"The "Lemon Law" applies to these problems if they arise during the first 18 months after the consumer received delivery of the vehicle or within the first 18,000 miles on the odometer."


This is totally and completely wrong. Maybe you should read the fucking law.

quote:
What lemon law covers a car 6 years later? Also what would the defect be? Bad gas milage is a sympton, not a replacable part.


Read the fucking lawsuit. Peters sued because Honda deliberately adjusted how the engine in those Hondas performed in order to not have to replace batteries that were failing within the warranty period. This is the reason she, and thousands of others, were getting substandard gas mileage. Honda is on record admitting they did this, they settled a class action suit admitting blame. The only difference with Peters is she opted out of the suit and sued on her own behalf.


By michael67 on 2/16/2012 11:42:32 AM , Rating: 1
Actually, coming from pancake flat mostly below sea level Holland, and now living in mountainis Norway, is see little difference in fuel consumption.

The extra fuel use to drive up gets equalized, when driving down.
Unless you have to break or gear down to prevent speeding

Also modern cars adjust for height, as exhaust gasses are being measured, and then the fuel ratio be adjusted accordingly.


By aebiv on 2/16/2012 12:38:20 PM , Rating: 2
Still though, the engine acts as a giant air pump, and the thinner the air is (higher elevation) the harder the engine has to work to achieve the same amount of power.

Going from sea level, to 10,000 ft elevation, that engine cannot acquire as much air when the piston travels down to suck in the air. Sure, it adjusts the fuel to not run rich, but that doesn't mean it is as efficient as it would be at sea level.

It is one of the main reasons back in the 90's that cars like SAAB were so popular in areas such as Denver Colorado, the turbo charger helped the engine achieve more air per revolution than it would without the turbo.


By Lord 666 on 2/16/2012 1:11:40 PM , Rating: 2
I live sea level in NJ. Other than the Accord and a 300zx turbo, have only owned 4 cylinders. Have always believed in fuel economy not for environmental reasons, but just because I am cheap and cannot justify spending more for getting point a to b.

In comparison, the 2006 Jetta TDI I own now exceeds the sticker mpg of 36/42.


By Lord 666 on 2/16/2012 1:16:08 PM , Rating: 2
The primary reasons why I sold the accord is the side impact was a death trap to the rear seat occupants and because of the poor fuel economy.

Wish there was an edit button...


By kattanna on 2/16/2012 2:55:51 PM , Rating: 2
I was always under the impression that those MPG numbers where a bit fabricated anyways. all done in some controlled lab where the car doesnt actually move but rests instead on rollers, like you see when you get your vehicle smogged.


By Jedi2155 on 2/16/2012 10:49:51 PM , Rating: 2
I have 3.5 years of gas/drive data on my 2003 Honda Civic LX, EPA rated at 25/34/29 City/Hwy/Combined. My average over 32,000 miles has been about 35-36 MPG peaking at 40 MPG on a single tank. My driving style has been 60-75 MPH typical 20% City/80% Hwy.

I have since switched to a Volt and I'm loving it.
https://www.voltstats.net/Stats/Details/578


By rich876 on 2/17/2012 9:40:26 AM , Rating: 2
Honda and Toyota are the biggest over-rated car brands on the market. I also learned the hard way years ago when I bought a Toyota. Blame Consumer Reports for this hype of quality. I had more problems with that car than any other cars I've owned. Got rid of it with with 25k miles on it.


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