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  (Source: dougburson.com)
The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers asked that some credits be given to automakers that improve technology to meet 2012-2016 requirements

The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers approached the Obama Administration earlier this week to request the use of credits to meet the proposed fuel efficiency standards.

Last year, major automakers, the state of California, and the White House agreed on the new Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) proposal that would boost fleet wide fuel economy to 54.5 mpg by 2025. The effort aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lessen the country's dependency on foreign oil. The new rules also included a mid-term review to make sure that the 2021-2025 requirements are probable, which the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers also addressed this week.

The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, which represents Toyota Motor Corp., Detroit's Big Three automakers and eight other automakers, has requested that carmakers obtain some credits for improving technology to meet 2012-2016 requirements set by the new fuel efficiency standards proposal instead of automakers only receiving credits if they are "in use in a minimum percentage of its overall fleet."

"Providing this program feature in the earlier years improves the usefulness of the credit program and encourages manufacturers to introduce the listed technologies sooner," said the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers.

More specifically, the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers would like automakers to obtain some credits for improving active grill shutters, start-stop technology, air conditioning and high efficiency lights for the 2012-2016 technology requirements.

The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers also asked that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) explain the mid-term evaluation process as well as the specifics that will be reviewed. In addition, automakers want to know that the "timeline and procedures for assuring that the studies relied upon by the agencies are appropriately peer reviewed."

Automakers added that they shouldn't be held responsible for emissions from electricity generation from EVs.

"Automakers may now be called on to not only make an unprecedented investment into vehicles with lower emissions, but to also fill the void between this rulemaking and a comprehensive national energy policy," said the automakers.

The new rules are expected to save drivers $1.7 trillion at the pump, but the National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) said last month that the new proposal could add as much as $5,000 to the sticker price of a new vehicle in 2025.

Source: The Detroit News



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RE: consumer choice
By Spuke on 2/14/2012 5:32:30 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Errr.. you seem to have the same problem.
Yes and their problem is they're ok with forcing the population into more fuel efficient cars whether or not the population wants them. They state you can still buy a large vehicle but fail to see that the automakers MUST meet the CAFE requirements. These requirements do NOT make it easy (and maybe not even possible) for the automakers to build these larger vehicles. But what if people want larger vehicles and there are little to none available due to government regulations, what happens then (other than used car prices for these vehicles skyrocketing)?

I will guess that these people will insist that large vehicles will continue to be made despite CAFE regs, even though their presence reduces the automakers CAFE average. How do you do both?

My opinion, large vehicles will be made but will be extremely expensive and only the wealthy will be able to afford them. If the general population wants one they'll have to fight each other over the used one's, driving the prices up to where only the wealthy (again) can afford them. So, no regular person will own a large vehicle and depending on how stubborn we are, we won't buy a new smaller car either. Automakers lose money, GM gets another bailout. Wash, rinse, repeat.


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