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The Toyota Prius c hybrid is available in four grades, ranging from $18,950 to $23,230

At the North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) last month, Toyota proudly unveiled its new 2012 Prius c hybrid. The automaker boasted that the latest Prius member would be both fuel efficient and affordable, and today, the actual price figures have been released.

The starting manufacturer's suggested retail price (MSRP) for the 2012 Prius c hybrid is $18,950. However, the Prius c will be available in four grades, offering more features the higher the grade. The Prius c One has an MSRP of $18,950, while the Prius c Two is priced at $19,900, the Prius c Three is priced at $ 21,635 and the Prius c Four is priced at $23,230.

All Prius c's will feature a Hybrid Synergy Drive 1.5-liter DOHC, 16-valve engine, a 144 volt nickel-metal hydride battery and a 60 HP permanent magnet AC synchronous motor for a combined hybrid system output of 99 HP. All Prius c's also offer Toyota's Star Safety System and nine standard airbags, and offer 53 mpg city and 46 mpg highway.

The Toyota Prius c One offers the basics like remote keyless entry, automatic climate control and a steering wheel with controls such as Bluetooth, audio and other options. Upgrading to the Prius c Two gets you a six-speaker audio system, a center console with armrest and storage, cruise control, engine immobilizer, a cargo area tonneau cover and a 60/40 split fold-down rear seat.


For those willing to bump up to the Prius c Three, drivers receive a plethora of technology for both entertainment and information such as a 6.1-inch touchscreen, Sirius XM Satellite Radio capability, HD Radio with iTunes Tagging, a Display Audio system with Navigation and Entune, advanced voice recognition, and a USB port with iPod connectivity. The Three also allows drivers to add 15-inch alloy wheels for an extra $390 and a power tilt/slide moonroof with sunshade for an extra $850.

The crème de la crème of the Prius c hybrids is the Four, with added 15-inch, 8-spoke alloy wheels, color-keyed heated power outside mirrors with turn signals, integrated fog lamps, and Softex-trimmed heated front seats. Prius c Four drivers can also choose to add a power tilt/slide moonroof with sliding shade for an extra $850, a 16-inch, 8-spoke alloy wheel package with P195/50R16 tires for an extra $300, or a 16-inch alloy wheel package that includes P195/50R16 tires and the moonroof with sliding sunshade for an extra $1,150.

"It's sized, priced, styled and packaged to appeal to young buyers on a budget who, until now, have probably found a hybrid experience out of reach," said Jim Lentz, Toyota USA president and CEO. "That's why we view the Prius as a gateway vehicle and a key component of our Prius strategy."


The Prius c hybrid will be available in dealerships in March 2012.

Source: Toyota



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RE: Dash
By Keeir on 2/9/2012 3:24:20 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
It's unethical and straight up un-American to constantly troll those of us exercising our First Amendment rights to speak out about the Volt and this situation to keep us quiet.


Really? Pot calling the Kettle Black much?

quote:
Because it's the car GM demoed to the taxpayers when the Government asked GM for evidence that they should get bailed out. Did you forget that?


Please provide me a link to this... I doubt the "Government" did any such thing. The Government was going to bail out GM regardless and to pretend otherwise is burying you head in the sand. Your angry at the Dog and Pony show... okay. Then say that...

"I am still angry at GM over the bailout and could never consider any of their products."

Not

Constantly and relentlessly railing against a specific product for trumped up and sometimes flat out made up reasons.

quote:
The Volt is on the road purely because of politics, BAD politics


Really? A Car aimed at a successful model, the Prius, conceived in 2006, final model outlined in 2008 is on the road because of BAD politics? That same would be true of ANY GM model then...

Listen Reclaimer, the Volt is what the Volt was always intended as.. a Low Volume initial test platform for future automobiles. The Toyota Prius, a volume seller now maybe but it started in the same way. It took 7 years to reach 100,000 units a year... and your expecting the Volt to double than in 1 year.

Or maybe you think a company like GM should only research, develop, and deploy for sale cars that on paper will definitely reach 100,000+ units a year in their first year? This is exactly the thinking that sunk GM.

A company like GM needs to look ahead and be developing the next big thing. This requires risks. Risks that sometimes pay off and sometimes do not pay off. Right now, it looks like the Volt wouldn't pay off. Of course the same would have been said of the Prius in 1999. Yet today, can anyone argue the Prius was a bad idea for Toyota?

But feel free to drive GM into the ground again by not even attempting to provide vision concepts and cars.


RE: Dash
By Reclaimer77 on 2/9/2012 4:41:05 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
But feel free to drive GM into the ground again by not even attempting to provide vision concepts and cars.


See that's what I mean, it seems like you're taking this personal like you're involved with the Volt somehow. What's your angle? There's just NO reason to have this response unless you're personally invested in seeing the Volt critics shut up. How am I "driving" them into the ground?

Do you own GM stock? Do you work with GM directly or indirectly? Are you a Government employee? I have no right to expect answers to this, but I really wish I knew.

quote:
The Government was going to bail out GM regardless and to pretend otherwise is burying you head in the sand.


Huh? Congress was totally gridlocked on the issue. It took an executive order from President Bush to force the Government into the bailouts. Stop with the revisionist history please.

GM IS going to drive itself into the ground again, because instead of a structured bankruptcy the company was given to the Unions and the Government. To believe a stronger company could possibly emerge from such a thing would go against everything I know. Most economists and analysts that have reviewed the bailout agree it's just a band-aid.


"It's okay. The scenarios aren't that clear. But it's good looking. [Steve Jobs] does good design, and [the iPad] is absolutely a good example of that." -- Bill Gates on the Apple iPad














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