backtop


Print


  (Source: zeeshan.netai.net)
Ramona Fricosu's attorney says she may have forgotten the password

Last month, a Colorado woman was ordered to decrypt her laptop in order to help prosecutors obtain evidence in the bank fraud case against her. Now, Ramona Fricosu's attorney is saying that the defendant may have forgotten her password, further prolonging the case and getting prosecutors nowhere with the hard drive.

"It's very possible to forget passwords," said Philip Dubois, Fricosu's attorney. "It's not clear to me she was the one who set up the encryption on this drive. I don't know if she will be able to decrypt it. The government will probably say you need to put her in jail until she breaks down and does what she is ordered to do. That will create a question of fact for the judge to resolve. If she's unable to decrypt the disc, the court cannot hold her in contempt."

Davies said Fricosu has not said in any court documents that she has forgotten the password. They are waiting to see what position she takes in court.

Fricosu was accused of bank fraud in 2010, and had her laptop seized by authorities for investigative purposes. When attempting to search her hard drive, authorities found that it was encrypted using full disk encryption, which prevents unauthorized access to data storage. The option can be found in operating systems like Mac OS and Windows, and if authorities tried to crack it themselves, they could damage the computer.

Colorado U.S. District Judge Robert Blackburn then ordered Fricosu to decrypt her hard drive and return it to the court so prosecutors could use the files against her in the bank fraud case. Fricosu tried using the Fifth Amendment to protect herself, arguing that it protects her from compelled self-incrimination.

However, Blackburn concluded that "the Fifth Amendment is not implicated by requiring production of unencrypted contents of the Toshiba Satellite M305 laptop computer." Assistant U.S. Attorney Patricia Davies backed Blackburn's decision, saying that encryption cannot be a sure way for criminals to bypass the system.

Source: Wired





"DailyTech is the best kept secret on the Internet." -- Larry Barber






Most Popular ArticlesSuper Hi- Vision Will Amaze the World
January 16, 2017, 9:53 AM
Samsung Chromebook Plus – Coming in February 2017
January 17, 2017, 12:01 AM
Samsung 2017 Handset’s Updates
January 17, 2017, 12:01 AM
Comparison – Surface Pro VS Tbook X5 Pro
January 21, 2017, 7:00 AM
Comparison – iPad Mini Vs Huawei MediaPad M3
January 19, 2017, 2:08 AM

Latest Blog Posts
Apple Watch
Saimin Nidarson - Jan 24, 2017, 6:51 AM
Some new News
Saimin Nidarson - Jan 23, 2017, 8:59 AM
What is new?
Saimin Nidarson - Jan 22, 2017, 7:00 AM
News
Saimin Nidarson - Jan 20, 2017, 7:00 AM
News of the World
Saimin Nidarson - Jan 19, 2017, 7:00 AM
Some tips
Saimin Nidarson - Jan 17, 2017, 12:16 AM
News of the Day
DailyTech Staff - Jan 16, 2017, 12:10 PM
Tech News
Saimin Nidarson - Jan 15, 2017, 12:32 AM
Here is Some News
Saimin Nidarson - Jan 14, 2017, 12:39 AM
News around the world
Saimin Nidarson - Jan 12, 2017, 12:01 AM
Rumors and Announcements
Saimin Nidarson - Jan 11, 2017, 12:01 AM
Some news of Day
Saimin Nidarson - Jan 7, 2017, 12:01 AM
News 2017 CES
Saimin Nidarson - Jan 6, 2017, 12:01 AM






botimage
Copyright 2017 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki