backtop


Print


  (Source: zeeshan.netai.net)
Ramona Fricosu's attorney says she may have forgotten the password

Last month, a Colorado woman was ordered to decrypt her laptop in order to help prosecutors obtain evidence in the bank fraud case against her. Now, Ramona Fricosu's attorney is saying that the defendant may have forgotten her password, further prolonging the case and getting prosecutors nowhere with the hard drive.

"It's very possible to forget passwords," said Philip Dubois, Fricosu's attorney. "It's not clear to me she was the one who set up the encryption on this drive. I don't know if she will be able to decrypt it. The government will probably say you need to put her in jail until she breaks down and does what she is ordered to do. That will create a question of fact for the judge to resolve. If she's unable to decrypt the disc, the court cannot hold her in contempt."

Davies said Fricosu has not said in any court documents that she has forgotten the password. They are waiting to see what position she takes in court.

Fricosu was accused of bank fraud in 2010, and had her laptop seized by authorities for investigative purposes. When attempting to search her hard drive, authorities found that it was encrypted using full disk encryption, which prevents unauthorized access to data storage. The option can be found in operating systems like Mac OS and Windows, and if authorities tried to crack it themselves, they could damage the computer.

Colorado U.S. District Judge Robert Blackburn then ordered Fricosu to decrypt her hard drive and return it to the court so prosecutors could use the files against her in the bank fraud case. Fricosu tried using the Fifth Amendment to protect herself, arguing that it protects her from compelled self-incrimination.

However, Blackburn concluded that "the Fifth Amendment is not implicated by requiring production of unencrypted contents of the Toshiba Satellite M305 laptop computer." Assistant U.S. Attorney Patricia Davies backed Blackburn's decision, saying that encryption cannot be a sure way for criminals to bypass the system.

Source: Wired





"Paying an extra $500 for a computer in this environment -- same piece of hardware -- paying $500 more to get a logo on it? I think that's a more challenging proposition for the average person than it used to be." -- Steve Ballmer



Latest Headlines
How Apple watch Series 2 differ from the S1
February 18, 2017, 5:37 AM
Chuwi LapBook
February 6, 2017, 6:49 AM
LG Watch Style
February 5, 2017, 8:00 AM
New iMac and Release Date
February 4, 2017, 9:30 AM




Latest Blog Posts
Around the World
Saimin Nidarson - Feb 18, 2017, 5:48 AM
News of Future
Saimin Nidarson - Feb 17, 2017, 6:30 AM
Some News
Saimin Nidarson - Feb 14, 2017, 5:36 AM
What's New?
Saimin Nidarson - Feb 10, 2017, 6:15 AM
Unleashed News
Saimin Nidarson - Feb 9, 2017, 6:00 AM
Eye catching news
Saimin Nidarson - Feb 8, 2017, 6:16 AM
Some World News
Saimin Nidarson - Feb 7, 2017, 6:15 AM
Today’s news
Saimin Nidarson - Feb 6, 2017, 10:11 AM
Some News
Saimin Nidarson - Feb 5, 2017, 7:27 AM
Notes and News
Saimin Nidarson - Feb 4, 2017, 5:53 AM
World News
Saimin Nidarson - Feb 3, 2017, 5:30 AM
Gadget News
Saimin Nidarson - Feb 2, 2017, 7:00 AM
News Around The World.
Saimin Nidarson - Feb 1, 2017, 7:20 AM
Some News
Saimin Nidarson - Jan 31, 2017, 7:57 AM
Tips of Today
Saimin Nidarson - Jan 30, 2017, 6:53 AM
What is new?
Saimin Nidarson - Jan 29, 2017, 6:26 AM






botimage
Copyright 2017 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki