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Foxconn factory in China  (Source: kitguru.net)
According to Apple executives and Foxconn management, safety is the last thing on Apple's mind

For hardcore Apple fans, rushing out to buy the next iPhone or iPad is a top priority -- even if it means standing in line for hours. But in the words of an anonymous former Apple executive, most people would be disturbed if they knew where their iPhone came from.

Apple's history with suppliers that are abusive to their employees is no secret. Foxconn and Wintek are among Apple's electronics suppliers that have factories in China with horrible working conditions, but no matter how many times violations of Apple's supplier code of conduct are brought to light, the situation remains the same. Now, The New York Times has taken a closer look at the bleak environment that the employees of Apple's Asian suppliers are forced to deal with in its second installment of its iEconomy series.

Apple's supplier code of conduct, which was developed in 2005, states "that working conditions in Apple's supply chain are safe, that workers are treated with respect and dignity, and that manufacturing processes are environmentally responsible." While this code was made with good intentions, it is not being upheld entirely by Apple or some of Apple's suppliers. Employees have complained of working long hours, unsafe working conditions and little pay -- all in the name of assembling iPhones, iPads and iPods at a rapid pace.

"You can either manufacture in comfortable, worker-friendly factories, or you can reinvent the product every year, and make it better and faster and cheaper, which requires factories that seem harsh by American standards," said a current Apple executive, who requested anonymity due to the sensitive topic. "And right now, customers care more about a new iPhone than working conditions in China."

Foxconn, which is Apple's electronics supplier in Chengdu, China, is one of the worst offenders of Apple's supplier code of conduct. Employees and worker advocates have both described the horrible conditions that workers must endure. Many work over 60 hours per week, putting in an obscene amount of overtime. Some work 12 hours per day, six days or more per week. Signs on the walls of Foxconn offer reminders such as, "Work hard on the job today or work hard to find a job tomorrow." There are 24-hour shifts, and 70,000 of the employees are crammed into tiny dorms when they have some time off. At times, about 20 workers would be stuffed into a three-bedroom apartment. There were also issues with the employment of under-age workers.

As if exhaustion and crowded living spaces weren't enough, the conditions within the actual factory were well below satisfactory. Aluminum dust clouded the Foxconn factories due to machines that polished iPad cases, and the factories had poor ventilation systems. A Hong Kong advocacy group called Students and Scholars Against Corporate Misbehavior published a warning, which was sent to Apple, to let the company know about the potential dangers of aluminum dust buildup.

The warning clearly went unnoticed, since two Foxconn factories exploded as a result of the aluminum dust. The first occurred in May 2011 in Foxconn's Chengdu factory, which killed four people and injured another 77. The second occurred in Shanghai and ended up injuring 59 workers while hospitalizing another 23.

The explosions weren't Foxconn's only high-profile issues over the last few years. In 2010, Foxconn's Shenzhen factory, which is responsible for Apple's iPods, iPhones and iPads, experienced a series of employee suicides due to the stressful and exhausting working conditions. There were at least 12 suicides during this time period as well as a riot. To address the issue, Foxconn made employees promise not to kill themselves and installed anti-suicide nets at its facilities.

"Conditions at Foxconn are anything but harsh," wrote Foxconn in a statement after the riot. "All assembly line employees are given regular breaks, including one-hour lunch breaks. Foxconn has a very good safety record. Foxconn has come a long way in our efforts to lead our industry in China in areas such as workplace conditions and the care and treatment of our employees."

Even Apple seemed to defend its supplier's factories overseas. Steve Jobs, former Apple CEO, made the factories sound like theme parks.

"I actually think Apple does one of the best jobs of any companies in our industry, and maybe in any industry, of understanding the working conditions in our supply chain," said Jobs. "I mean, you go to this place, and, it's a factory, but, my gosh, I mean, they've got restaurants and movie theaters and hospitals and swimming pools, and I mean, for a factory, it's a pretty nice factory."

Jobs' statement seems to contradict the company's own audits, though. Apple has been publishing audits of its supplier's factories since 2007, and completed 396 walkthroughs by last year. Each year, there have been several and consistent violations to Apple's supplier code of conduct. For instance, in 2007, Apple completed three dozen audits where two-thirds demonstrated employees working over the 60 hour limit. There were also cases of underage workers, falsified records, improper disposal of hazardous waste and cases where workers were paid below minimum wage (or even nothing at all) as punishment.

"Apple never cared about anything other than increasing product quality and decreasing production cost," said Li Mingqi, a former Foxconn Technology manager at the Chengdu factory. "Workers' welfare has nothing to do with their interests."

Source: The New York Times



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Waiting for the ironic comment
By Commodus on 1/27/2012 8:10:43 AM , Rating: 5
Just waiting for someone to say "I'm glad I don't use Apple products!" while writing that message on a Windows PC made at Foxconn, and then later going to play games on a console made at Foxconn and take a call on a phone made at Foxconn.

A lot of Anything But Apple advocates like to pretend that everything they use is made in some US factory with eight-hour shifts and free hot cocoa during breaks, but if they really wanted to avoid products made in harsh Chinese working conditions, they'd have to give up most of their technology. It's a problem everyone (Apple included) faces.




RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By StevoLincolnite on 1/27/2012 8:24:52 AM , Rating: 4
Agreed.

This is pretty much business as normal for most tech companies, it's just viewed as more "news worthy" because it's all about Apple.

Poor working conditions in factories happened in most of today's advanced economy when they had their industrial revolutions. - Probably worst than what is exhibited in the Foxconn factories where whippings, child labor and such was used.
As people in China get higher paid wages and better working conditions... The factories will be moved to somewhere else where it's cheap.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By Reclaimer77 on 1/27/12, Rating: -1
RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By AnnihilatorX on 1/27/2012 9:57:01 AM , Rating: 5
That's being ignorant, of course Apple can do something, but Apple probably won't.

Apple is awash with money, Wall street is talking about how Apple should spend its vast cash reserve in paying stake holders.

Why not sign an agreement with Foxconn to give people a payrise on Apple's expense? No they won't do that, that's too generous. There is no problem in investing extra factories in China to cope with demand and in doing so lower the load of current factories, cutting working hour by an hour for example will do a lot of good. No they won't do that, it's too moral.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By Reclaimer77 on 1/27/12, Rating: 0
By TroubledMacUser on 1/27/2012 10:11:19 PM , Rating: 5
This "there's nothing Apple can do about it" comment is patently and thoroughly false, and the best example disproving it is how much of a difference Nike made in improving third world factory conditions when it was pilloried for similar worker abuse.

Nike realized, after a period of making this same sort of "its globalization, there's little we can do" BS, that they were in danger of losing a priceless lifestyle brand that celebrated health and freedom, but that hardly gibed with brutal, unsafe and anti-labor conditions in harsh and poorly ventilated factories around Southeast Asia. Nike got in gear, read the riot act to their suppliers, brought in inspectors and worked closely with their suppliers to transform conditions around Asia. It was very influential and helped spur changes in the entire sector, as well as empowering workers to speak up and be able to organize. Nike largely got it done.

Apple has ten times the pull of Nike. If Apple threatened to pull their work out of Foxconn and its suppliers if this stuff continues to go on, things would change overnight, believe me. Apple should already start diversifying their manufacturing so no one supplier has them at any disadvantage. I'd like to see a lot more jobs in the US as well.

The consumers have the power to force Apple to act, and Apple can revolutionize working conditions to the benefit of everyone. Toxic materials in China are already blowing into Seattle and the West Coast. The whole thing needs to be done as a high tech, clean venture, not recreate the bad old days.

The idea we or Apple can't fix it is beyond preposterous, its patently false. People are smart, they can make factories safe, give workers good conditions and a voice. Nike did it.


By dark matter on 1/31/2012 2:36:31 AM , Rating: 3
Obviously you have no idea about economics, blatantly. Do you even understand anything about brand perception, and the effect it can have on your bottom line. Obviously not.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By MrBlastman on 1/27/2012 10:34:17 AM , Rating: 4
Sure they can--by taking responsibility for it. Instead of focusing on huge profit margins (they are HUGE), they could instead move their production to the USA, cut margins significantly, provide jobs here and produce something made inside our own country. They might have to raise prices if they do so... but, the Apple goons have show literally no regard for price to begin with, anyways. They'll still buy their products en masse even if they have to pay ten or fifteen percent more.

That sounds like a reasonable solution to me.

I'd happily pay ten or fifteen percent more for anything I buy if I knew it were made in America. Sure, I might have "less" stuff, but I could care less. Most of us don't need tons of stuff to begin with so if it means supporting our own, I'm all for it.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By xti on 1/27/2012 10:39:32 AM , Rating: 1
yeah, you would pay 15-20%...oooohhh 40 whole bucks.

what about those shareholders who have invested many times that?

this is like the taco bell/tomato pickers thing a few years back. as mentioned 100 times already, the east based contract manufactures are the problem. not apple.

HP and others do business with FC. where is their DT article?


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By MrBlastman on 1/27/2012 10:47:58 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
what about those shareholders who have invested many times that?


Shareholders? Really, you seriously are going to argue based on that? Okay, fine. Let's take a look. :) I'll even play fair by not picking the lowest point.

April of 2008, AAPL was 173.95 at close, today, AAPL is 445.49. That's in just shy of four years. That's a total return of 156%.

Hmm, they've not only doubled their money in less than five years, they've done way better. Average return a year is expected to be around 5-7%. If you go by long-term averages, it might be 11%. If you look at the last few years, most investors are lucky to have broken EVEN in that same timespan in any other company They have far exceeded this. AAPL has been a complete WIN for anyone holding the stock. There is no need to pay any of these profits to these shareholders.

The thing you don't get is--Apple is now an industry leader. They no longer are the little guy. They are THE guy to beat now. They should be leading by example at this point rather than pulling the whole: "Hey man, it's hip to support Apple because we're bringing down the man!"

They have the profit levels now to easily support infrastructure expansion within our nation. Instead of building some stupid, round fancy corporate headquarters, build factories to do things right, here.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By Reclaimer77 on 1/27/2012 10:57:53 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
They have the profit levels now to easily support infrastructure expansion within our nation. Instead of building some stupid, round fancy corporate headquarters, build factories to do things right, here.


Until you acknowledge the decimation of our manufacturing base, and the root causes of that, it's hard to take you serious when you say things like this.

The iPhone cannot be built in America. It just can't. It's really sad that you wont admit this.


By StevoLincolnite on 1/27/2012 7:43:54 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The iPhone cannot be built in America. It just can't. It's really sad that you wont admit this.


Actually... I wouldn't be surprised if it could be built in the US as Apple has such a fat profit margin.

Plus the US Minimum wage is something like only $7 isn't it?
With the dollar worth so low, would be interesting to see if it could be done.

But worker pay shouldn't be an issue, $7 an hour is a pittance when Apple is making $400,000+ profit per employee.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By xti on 1/30/2012 12:10:19 PM , Rating: 2
so...they should give up some profit, because they already 4x'd their investment?

its maximizing profit. not maximizing profit - $1.00.

would it be a nice gesture? sure. but i dont log onto etrade and try to find someone who wants to help the environment or some other crap, im trying to make money.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By Reclaimer77 on 1/27/2012 10:45:22 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
Instead of focusing on huge profit margins (they are HUGE), they could instead move their production to the USA


They can't. And I'm really tired of being in a position to defend Apple, a company I hate, by pointing out the logistics and realities of the situation.

quote:
I'd happily pay ten or fifteen percent more for anything I buy if I knew it were made in America.


Please! 10-15? It would cost something like 300% more to build the iPhone here.

Also, like I said, all the parts that go into the iPhone come from factories 25 miles from Foxconn. Those parts aren't going to be made here. So to make the iPhone in America Apple would have to ship all the components from across the ocean. Do you realize the economics of that?

Come on Blastman, you're smarter than this. I know you are. I hate Apple too, but at some point we have to realize the reality of the situation. The manufacturing scale needed to meet the iDevice demand doesn't and has never existed in this country at any time. Maybe during WWII, at the height of our manufacturing ability, maybe. But today? Forget about it. Are you being serious?


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By MrBlastman on 1/27/2012 11:12:47 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Are you being serious?


No, I'm being idealistic right now. ;)

See, before Apple was the big guy, the i-people were the ideallists. Now, we the Apple-haters... get to swap places with them. That's how it works. :P

America has a problem. We are a service-based economy. It is one of the primary reasons our recovery is going to be long and drawn out, economically speaking. Why? Because when the economy is terrible, what do people have little of?

Money.

What do people have a lot of when the economy is bad?

Time.

When people have a shortage of money but a overstock of time, where do they make cuts first? They make cuts on things they can do themselves--i.e. services. I'm generalizing here but it serves the purpose of my point. So if people cut on services... and we see this easiest by looking at the number of say Restaurants that have closed (an astounding number) or the number of contractors out of business. People are doing more themselves.

Hence, a service based economy is not self-sustaining on just services alone. A proper economy needs to be balanced with services and production. Without ample production, there is no true net gain to a nations net worth. You might argue there is an intellectual premium on a service-based society but without some true, solid backing, it is only worth what people will pay (or want) for it at the time. If you take a service company that can't make a profit nor cover even their fixed costs--what value do they have to a buyer? None to very little. If you take a manufacturing company in the same situation--you have intrinsic value in the property, plant etc. as well as inventory.

America's big problem is not only blatant buying on credit, overfueled bankers and careless Realtors/Mortgage brokers, it is their lack of ability to produce substance that adds to their net worth. Manufacturing and industry can do this.

Is it really Apple's responsibility to do this? No. Is it ideal? Yes. Would it set an example that others could follow? Yes.

They have the profits now so it can easily be done.

quote:
Please! 10-15? It would cost something like 300% more to build the iPhone here.


You're right here. The phone might cost something like 200-300% more to produce. But, you're taking my figure out of context. I was referring to the ultimate impact to the consumer, not to the operating costs of Apple.

See, you have to remember their margins are huge. You also have to remember the costs of goods sold on the balance sheet encompasses far more than the manufacturing cost. It also includes things such as shipping, procurement, development and more. None of us are privy to these fundamentals as GAAP practices along with SEC requirements do not require disclosure of such things. I'm pretty sure though an i-Phone doesn't cost 400.00 to make. In fact, I remember reading figures like these:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2395035,00.as...

Stating the parts cost about 188.00 for a 4S. Add in the manufacturing costs and they go up to 196.00 total. Wait, manufacturing _only_ costs... 8.00? Yes, that's correct.

8 bucks to manufacture the thing.

Now, if we take into account these workers in China are making peanuts:

http://finance.yahoo.com/blogs/daily-ticker/apple-...

Less than 1.00 an hour and factor that with the average American minimum wage... 7.25 an hour... Lets do the math assuming 1.00 an hour for Chinese employees.

8.00/1.00 = 8 hours work.
7.25 an hour * 8 hours work = 58.00.

Cost increase--more than SEVEN TIMES. But wait, lets factor that into the total cost.

188.00 + 58.00 = 246.00

246 - 196 = 50.00 difference.
50/196 = 25.5% increase in cost.

Wait, only 25% more to make? That's right!

All of a sudden, my 10-15% increase to the consumer becomes more feasible, right? It totally does. Apple might eat part of the increase because it isn't much at all when you look at the numbers this way.

So, yes, while you at first thought it would cost 300% more, it really doesn't. Well, that is, until you factor in the costs to build a factory and tool a line.

Thankfully though, those costs are one-time (though lines must be re-tooled to produce new types of product) and this is what profits are for that are not paid out to shareholders in the form of dividends. Like most things I post... I typically simplify them based on rational, tangible data like above.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By Reclaimer77 on 1/27/2012 11:27:51 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
No, I'm being idealistic right now. ;)


LOL okay, you had me worried there. You sure are :)

You know as a Conservative I'm forced to point out it's not just labor costs keeping the iPhone in China, but the sheer regulatory burden we've placed on our manufacturing base, right?

Not to mention the entire supply chain exists in China for all the parts that go into these devices. So not only would Apple have to set up shop here. But some 30 other companies too. As an Apple executive once said:

“The entire supply chain is in China now. You need a thousand rubber gaskets? That’s the factory next door. You need a million screws? That factory is a block away. You need that screw made a little bit different? It will take three hours.”

quote:
Is it really Apple's responsibility to do this? No. Is it ideal? Yes. Would it set an example that others could follow? Yes.


No I think that would more likely be the death of the company quite frankly. Or at the very least marginalize them to the point they would no longer be a competitive entity. Apple would become the new RIM.

quote:
Stating the parts cost about 188.00 for a 4S. Add in the manufacturing costs and they go up to 196.00 total. Wait, manufacturing _only_ costs... 8.00? Yes, that's correct. 8 bucks to manufacture the thing.


A lot of that is due to scale and bulk pricing. When you can make millions of something a day, the cost per-unit goes way down.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By MrBlastman on 1/27/2012 11:39:40 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
No I think that would more likely be the death of the company quite frankly. Or at the very least marginalize them to the point they would no longer be a competitive entity. Apple would become the new RIM.


I'd be happy with that. I'd be more happy though with more jobs in America.

Regulation has gotten out of hand here and it is a big reason we see less jobs here. At this point I'd bet people would be more willing to trade in some of that oversight for more employment potential.

It isn't _that_ out of hand though. Just look at Subaru, Honda or Toyota and how successful their plants have been on our soil.

While it might hurt our companies at first to transition back here, in the end it would be far better for everyone.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By yomamafor1 on 1/27/2012 12:09:57 PM , Rating: 2
The difference is, Toyota / Honda / Nissan don't have the short product cycles like most high tech companies. Car companies' developmental cycles are usually more than 2~3 years. Apple, with its very limited amount of product lines, has the product cycle of 1 year.

And no, the main issue with manufacturing in the US is NOT the labor cost (which Apple estimates will cost them an additional $65/iphone to be manufactured here). The main issue is flexibility and turn around time. NYT did an article on this, and I think anyone who bashes Apple for manufacturing oversea should read it.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/22/business/apple-a...

In short, unless we train an abundance of engineers, are willing to work for 12+ hours straight without the need to see your kids, and are willing to wake up at 1am to work, without overtime, the inconvenient truth is that the manufacturing jobs are not returning home.

That's why when Obama asked Jobs, what it would take for the manufacturing jobs to return to the US, Jobs simply replied, "they aren't coming back".


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By MrBlastman on 1/27/2012 12:28:01 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
In short, unless we train an abundance of engineers, are willing to work for 12+ hours straight without the need to see your kids, and are willing to wake up at 1am to work, without overtime, the inconvenient truth is that the manufacturing jobs are not returning home.


I bet a lot of unemployed people would be willing to do that... Well, minus the overtime since labor laws prevent that here. Oh, wait, they'd just have to hire _more_ people to do the work instead.

A refreshed, rotated workforce is far more efficient than an overworked, under-rested one.


By yomamafor1 on 1/27/2012 12:35:17 PM , Rating: 1
Actually, there are tons of jobs available for that kind of working condition. They mostly exist in agricultural industries, and hotel industries (maid).

Guess how many applicants they receive per year from "unemployed" American? If you guess more than a single digit, you're wrong.

Oh, a refreshed, rotated workforce is indeed more efficient than an overworked, under-rested one. But they also have more people to take over the jobs the last person left, not to mention the fact that Americans usually have lower working efficiency compared to their Asian counterparts.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By AdamChew on 1/27/2012 9:56:46 PM , Rating: 2
Just because you lay out your figures so you think it is easy to do.

If it is so simple why HP and Dell are not doing it.

Cut the crap that Apple can afford it. have you consider that the 4S has the same design as the 4 and it is riding on the RD of the 4 and Apple has saved a bundle on the design and RD.

Why not you do something and not talk and talk is cheap.

Why not petition HP or Dell to do their manufacturing in the US.

But then it makes my day to see so much envy and hate for a company which 10 years ago was on its death bed.

Yes then no one cares they are bleeding cash.

So why the interest now.

Btw taking care of the people is the government's job and not Apple's and Apple don't owe you a living and if you need to cry go and cry at your government representative for not doing enough to create jobs.

One last thing why don't you scream at the banks and banksters for bring the US economy to its knees with their trade in CDOs and what have you. Today's predicament is brought on them them.

Yes these guys pay themselves obscene salaries and that's what you called greed. Now what have they done to improve the economy - nothing and they don't even lend each other money because they fear the other guy may just go out of business.

Climb down from that high horse and look yourself in the mirror before you accuse others of not doing enough and no one owes you a living.


By MrBlastman on 1/28/2012 12:31:12 AM , Rating: 1
Wow. I don't know what to say. Your post is hilarious in so many ways.

First, learn some grammar and sentence structure.

quote:
Why not you do something and not talk and talk is cheap.


I would but uhh guess what? I'm not a. Working for a tech company, b. Not in a manufacturing industry and c. Apple never offered me a job as CEO so--I can't. Nice try in an empty argument.

quote:
But then it makes my day to see so much envy and hate for a company which 10 years ago was on its death bed.


I have no envy for Apple. I dislike their products and moreso dislike how they charge a premium for a product that does LESS than my PC or other devices can do--while forcing me to submit to limitations on their platforms they place there to control the end-user.

Their products have done nothing but piss me off in the past... well, ever since the Apple IIe became ancient. I have no need or use for Apple products in my life. I do just fine without them.

quote:
Btw taking care of the people is the government's job


This is your opinion. In my opinion, taking care of the people is the PEOPLE's job. NOT the Government. The Government's only role is to defend our borders and enforce the rule of law. That's it. Nothing else. I don't believe we the people should rely on the Government for everything.

quote:
Climb down from that high horse


High horse? Where? In order for me to BE on a high horse I'd first have to claim I'm better than everyone else (or a group). I'm not. Where I am at is surveying the situation and providing my two cents on what might better everyone else.

That's not a high horse. Look it up.


By cactusdog on 1/30/2012 8:21:49 PM , Rating: 2
You're full of crap Reclaimer. Its totally false to say the Iphone couldnt be produced in America. Have you seen the insides of these devices, its a small pcb with a few chips on it. Producing a motor car is 1000 times more complex than producing an iphone and the US still makes cars.

This is just corporate greed and recklessness. There are plenty of huge industries in China, none have as bad a reputation as Foxconn. When Apple denies any problems by saying the factories are really nice because they have a movie theatre, just goes to show that they dont give a dam about them. And the other difference with Apple is they have the cheek to charge $800 for something that costs $20 to make.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By yomamafor1 on 1/27/2012 12:02:18 PM , Rating: 2
50k engineering and management positions? LOL

Try <30k, and most engineering positions are around $15~20k.


By Reclaimer77 on 1/27/2012 12:04:35 PM , Rating: 2
Ummm 50k positions. NOT the salaries of those jobs. Sorry if I didn't clarify.


By TroubledMacUser on 1/27/2012 10:08:34 PM , Rating: 2
This "there's nothing Apple can do about it" comment is patently and thoroughly false, and the best example disproving it is how much of a difference Nike made in improving third world factory conditions when it was pilloried for similar worker abuse.

Nike realized, after a period of making this same sort of "its globalization, there's little we can do" BS, that they were in danger of losing a priceless lifestyle brand that celebrated health and freedom, but that hardly gibed with brutal, unsafe and anti-labor conditions in harsh and poorly ventilated factories around Southeast Asia. Nike got in gear, read the riot act to their suppliers, brought in inspectors and worked closely with their suppliers to transform conditions around Asia. It was very influential and helped spur changes in the entire sector, as well as empowering workers to speak up and be able to organize. Nike largely got it done.

Apple has ten times the pull of Nike. If Apple threatened to pull their work out of Foxconn and its suppliers if this stuff continues to go on, things would change overnight, believe me. Apple should already start diversifying their manufacturing so no one supplier has them at any disadvantage. I'd like to see a lot more jobs in the US as well.

The consumers have the power to force Apple to act, and Apple can revolutionize working conditions to the benefit of everyone. Toxic materials in China are already blowing into Seattle and the West Coast. The whole thing needs to be done as a high tech, clean venture, not recreate the bad old days.

The idea we or Apple can't fix it is beyond preposterous, its patently false. People are smart, they can make factories safe, give workers good conditions and a voice. Nike did it.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By Supa on 1/27/2012 10:15:07 AM , Rating: 1
It's sensationalized "journalism" for viewership.

These kind of articles are intentionally written to mislead and misinform.

Shameless.

---


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By Cobra Commander on 1/27/2012 8:47:59 AM , Rating: 2
Amen. People hear "Foxconn" and assume (due primarily to inadequate and/or biased reporting) that Foxconn is just some run-of-the-mill Chinese sweatshop when it fact it is one of the biggest if not the biggest OEM part suppliers in the industry filling up your Dell, HP, etc.

Pinning Apple down exclusively shows how simple some people are.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By hughlle on 1/27/2012 9:21:22 AM , Rating: 3
Also worth to bear in mind however that just because an ipad and one of it's competitors come from the same manufacturer, that is not to say both production lines operate in the same manner.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By icrf on 1/27/2012 9:34:05 AM , Rating: 2
Yeah, I'd like to see reviews of conditions at other Foxconn factories for other companies. The Apple exec made it sound like a big part of the problem is their product life cycle and how hard they push, something many companies may not stress so much.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By AnnihilatorX on 1/27/2012 9:58:59 AM , Rating: 2
Yes but which company runs massive assembly line to manufacture such a vast quantities of product 24/7 in any scale compared to iphone and ipads?

Different economies of scale affects factory conditions. Last time I checked no one committed suicide when they weren't making iphones.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By ilt24 on 1/27/2012 10:14:38 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Different economies of scale affects factory conditions. Last time I checked no one committed suicide when they weren't making iphones.


Who do you check with?


By Bobby2000 on 1/31/2012 5:01:44 PM , Rating: 2
You are entitled to your own opinion, but not your own set of facts.

Chinese Foxconn Workers Threaten Mass Suicide Over Xbox Pay Dispute
1/12/2012 Forbes
http://www.forbes.com/sites/erikkain/2012/01/12/ch...

This problem is bigger than Apple, until those of you pretending otherwise acknowedge that, you have nothing worthwhile to contribute to the discussion.

How many FOXCONN manufactured items do you own?


By teflonbilly on 1/27/2012 9:22:57 AM , Rating: 2
I think, for myself, the point to take away from this is the lack of commitment that Apple is showing to its own guidelines. These guidelines are being used to give an image of care and concern for these workers, when really nothing is being done to fix the issues.

I know that a lot of the components in my computers and other electronics come out of these factories, but i can't remember the last time one of these companies said that they follow strict guidelines, then lied to us saying that Foxconn has great factories.

Oh and I am glad I don't use Apple products. Though not for the foxconn issues.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By ilt24 on 1/27/2012 10:07:13 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Just waiting for someone to say "I'm glad I don't use Apple products!"


I'm just waiting for someone to say, "hey doesn't Foxconn also make Kindles, Playstations, XBoxes and Wiis along with other products for HP, Nokia, Sony, Logitech, IBM...."


By sprockkets on 1/27/2012 10:31:45 AM , Rating: 3
Nintendo lost 575 million while apple made 13 billlion . They can afford to do something about it. But they won't.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By Darksurf on 1/27/2012 1:28:56 PM , Rating: 2
Foxconn makes cheap garbage and is an evil company. I custom build all my machines and I'm an AMD/Asus fanboy. I buy everything I can ASUS, and sometimes other Taiwanese,korean, japanese, or american brands.


RE: Waiting for the ironic comment
By hiscross on 1/28/2012 9:33:20 AM , Rating: 2
This NYTimes piece says the US can't build iPhones or any other mobile device even if they wanted to -> http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/22/business/apple-a...

Just to the Detroit and look around. America is a shopping cart, no longer a producer. If the US stops buying, the motor of the world stops.


"It's okay. The scenarios aren't that clear. But it's good looking. [Steve Jobs] does good design, and [the iPad] is absolutely a good example of that." -- Bill Gates on the Apple iPad














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