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Print 10 comment(s) - last by yomamafor1.. on Jan 10 at 1:05 PM

Ultrabooks continue to flood CES

As we alluded earlier today, Intel has deemed 2012 to be the "Year of the Ultrabook". Given the number of Ultrabooks that we seen over the past few days, that statement rings true. Samsung today announced its new Series 9 and Series 5 Ultrabooks, which are available in 13", 14", and 15" form factors.
 
First up is the Series 9 with its "single shell" aluminum body. The 13" and 15" models share similar specs with both getting a 1.6GHz Intel Core i5 processor (2467M), Intel HD 3000 graphics, 128GB SSD, 1600x900 screen resolution, 802.11n Wi-Fi, and Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit.
 
The 13" model comes with 4GB of RAM and weighs in at a mere 2.5 pounds. The 15" comes standard with 8GB of RAM and packs on an extra pound of weight. The 13" and 15" Series 9 Ultrabooks are priced at $1,399 and $1,499 respectively and will be available for order on February 27.


Samsung Series 9
 
“When designing the new Series 9, we focused on improving key elements that our customers loved in the original award winning Series 9, including the sophisticated, lightweight design,” said Todd Bouman, vice president of product marketing at Samsung Enterprise Business Division.
 
Next up is the Samsung 5 Series, which can be found in 13" and 14" screen sizes. The 14" Series 5 Ultrabook, unlike most other Ultrabooks on the market, includes a DVD burner. The 13" models do without the DVD burner.
 
Otherwise, the specs of the Series 5 Ultrabooks are pretty similar. They all include the Intel Core i5 2467M processor, 4GB of memory, 1366x768 screen resolution, and Intel HD 3000 graphics.


Samsung Series 5
 
The 14" model weighs in a 3.94 pounds, includes a 500GB HDD, and is priced at $949. The 13" model weighs 3.24 pounds, includes a 500GB, and is priced at $899. If you prefer an SSD with your Series 5 Ultrabook, a 128GB SSD will raise the entry fee to $1,099.
 
The Series 5 Ultrabooks will be available starting January 30.

Source: Samsung



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By nangryo on 1/9/2012 9:19:00 PM , Rating: 2
Do they have exclusive deal with Intel or what? Though some people will feel that Intel graphic offering is enough, it's nice if they too offer an option with ATI/NVIDIA discrete graphic chip model.




By alcalde on 1/9/2012 10:10:03 PM , Rating: 2
In a sense, yes. All of these ultrabooks were created at the urging of Intel and the developers are receiving subsidies from Intel to reach the price point.

I agree with you; I'd prefer something with a bit more graphic power as well, even if it meant a thicker laptop.


By vol7ron on 1/10/2012 12:48:38 AM , Rating: 2
I agree with you, but I'd also like a Unicorn. Problem is, no one's created one yet.

One day GPUs will be small enough that the heat/power won't be as much of a problem. In current time, this isn't a power user laptop, it's a travel laptop. BTW, Sandy Bridge has HD 3000, Ivy Bridge will have HD 4000; perhaps the mobile chips will come with HD 4000 - from what I hear 4000 will be another big upgrade, maybe not as big as HD 3000 over Intel GMA, but still big.

Also, I purchased a MacBook Air 13", which I agreed, wasn't powerful enough for medium gaming, so I had to get the Pro (went Apple for App design). If these ultrabooks are pricing at the same prices as the MacBook Air, w/o the HD screen, then I'm curious what the outcome will be. What I still don't get is why Intel doesn't provide it's own laptop - it makes motherboards and procs, I'd think they'd be able to make a case to put it in and attach a screen.


By B3an on 1/10/2012 4:38:14 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
I agree with you; I'd prefer something with a bit more graphic power as well, even if it meant a thicker laptop.

Then get a thicker laptop! It's not like you dont have a million choices out there. For everyone else who wants thin and light - this is for them. Discrete graphics are pretty much wasted on 95% of laptops anyway, which is why Intel have the highest GPU market share in the first place.


By AliShawkat on 1/9/2012 10:11:41 PM , Rating: 2
You really think you can put a dedicated gpu into something that thin? It'll go on fire.


By nangryo on 1/9/2012 10:37:47 PM , Rating: 2
Not necessarily the High end one. Just put the medium class GPU on there I think it's more than enough.


By Mint on 1/9/2012 11:27:26 PM , Rating: 2
If they can't go from a 17W processor to a 35W one, then they can't put much of a GPU in there. It has to be at least HD 6500M class to be a worthwhile upgrade over Intel's HD3000, and that has a TDP of over 10W.

I think Llano is your best bet for a thin and light gaming notebook. I hope somebody fits one into a thin-and-light.


By yomamafor1 on 1/10/2012 1:05:56 PM , Rating: 2
Actually, a medium class GPU (let's say GT 540M) has a TDP of about 35W. There is no way a notebook manufacturer can fit both CPU (17W) and GPU (35W) in the chassis that was designed only to handle 17W.


By CityZen on 1/9/2012 10:59:40 PM , Rating: 2
Because a dedicated video card wouldn't fit ...?


By HrilL on 1/10/2012 11:35:52 AM , Rating: 2
Hmm you'd think they have some with an AMD fusion APU. While you'd lose some CPU power the much more powerful graphics power would clearly make up for it. Intel's HD 3000 GPU is crap. It can't even play CS 1.6 without massive frame rate drop when there is a lot of action or a smoke is thrown. Its pretty sad Intel can't make a GPU that can play a 13 year old game.


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