backtop


Print 68 comment(s) - last by priusone.. on Jan 14 at 1:08 PM


2013 Ford Fusion EcoBoost 2.0
Ford assaults the midsize sedan market with the 2013 Fusion

The next generation Ford Fusion has been a highly anticipated vehicle in the auto industry. The midsize sedan market has been heating up and Ford needed to bring its A-Game in order to stay competitive. Well we can safely say that Ford did indeed bring its A-Game, and may end up sending its competitors back to the drawing board early in the powertrain department.
 
The new Fusion lineup which now consists solely of four-cylinder engines:
  • 2.5-liter naturally aspirated (170hp/170 lb-ft)
  • 1.6-liter EcoBoost (179hp/172 lb-ft)
  • 2.0-liter EcoBoost (237hp/250 lb-ft)
  • 2.0-liter naturally aspirated (Atkinson-cycle) hybrid
  • 2.0-liter naturally aspirated (Atkinson-cycle) plug-in hybrid 
The 1.6-liter EcoBoost will deliver 26mpg in the city and 37mpg on the highway, topping all non-hybrid competitors.


2013 Ford Fusion Hybrid
 
Likewise, the new Fusion Hybrid with the normally aspirated 2.0-liter engine will now deliver 47mpg in the city and 44mpg on the highway. The increased fuel economy (from 41/36) comes from the downsized engine (the old Fusion Hybrid used an Atkinson-cycle 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine) and a new lithium-ion battery pack. Thanks to the more powerful battery, the Fusion Hybrid can now travel at up to 62mph on battery power alone.
 
For comparison (city/highway):

2013 Ford Fusion Energi

As for the Fusion Energi Plug-in Hybrid, Ford will only say that it will be rated for 100 MPGe, which makes it more efficient than a Chevrolet Volt.
 
The 2.0-liter EcoBoost will take the place of the previous V6 engine. Although fuel economy numbers haven't yet been released for this model, there's no doubt that the 2.0-liter EcoBoost will offer similar performance while sipping less fuel. The 2.0-liter EcoBoost will also be available in FWD and AWD variants.
 
And we can't forget the dramatic new styling direction with the Fusion. Gone is the Gillette-esque grille that has been replaced with a nose that wouldn't seem out of place on an Aston Martin. There's no doubt the 2013 Ford Fusion will be the most dramatically styled mainstream sedan on the market, and consumers won't have to drive "design-challenged" vehicles like the Toyota Prius and Honda Insight to get incredible fuel economy across the board.

2013 Ford Fusion interior 

When it comes to technology, the Fusion Hybrid will be available with SYNC, the much-maligned MyFord Touch infotainment system, lane departure warning, adaptive cruise control, active park assist, and blind spot monitoring.

The 2013 Ford Fusion will be in U.S. showrooms in the latter half of 2012.

Source: Ford



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

By Keeir on 1/9/2012 6:03:07 PM , Rating: 2
Fuel economy numbers are based on the EPA Testing Cycle, which uses set speeds over set intervals. Having a more or less powerful engine does not affect the actual cycle itself. (Though in the real world it would likely affect things)

Having an engine capable of producing more HP does not immediately change the fuel economy numbers. The question is more about how the automaker went about producing more HP. In the case of NA engines, the engine designer essentially plays with displacement and stroke length to add a higher upper end power. Typically higher displacement engines require more fuel during idle/low load situations than lower displacement engines, and thus score worse of the EPA cycle. This can be somewhat countered by cylinder de-activation. Higher displacement engines also tend to mass significantly more, leading to lower fuel economy numbers as well. In the case of Turbo, Super Chargers, etc, the engine designer creates a situation where more air is forced into the same displacement area allowing more fuel and thus more power. In this situation, the effects of producing higher theoretical hp may not have a significant effect on EPA cycle results. In practice, fuel injectors typically need to be upsized, which leads to less tolerance, which leads to higher idle consumption and the turbo parts do have mass. Its unlikely that a 1.6 engine producing 130 hp or so would be more than 5% more economical that the ecoboost they are choosing for the Fusion. Potentially you'd be looking at maybe a 1 MPG combined difference. Faced across from that might be a result that is not good for the US market. For example, 0-60 times slower than 10 seconds is usually a significant problem for marketing.


"Death Is Very Likely The Single Best Invention Of Life" -- Steve Jobs














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki