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  (Source: deviantart.net)
Apple took second place with 28.7 percent market share

The latest comScore report shows that Android is still dominating U.S. mobile subscriber market share ahead of Apple's iOS.

The report, which measures mobile market share for the U.S. during a three month period ending November 2011, provides an average among over 30,000 U.S. mobile subscribers.

According to comScore, 234 million Americans age 13 and over used mobile devices in the three month period, and 91.4 million of them are smartphone owners. Android-based devices took the lead position with 46.9 percent share in the smartphone market. Apple took second place with 28.7 percent, followed by RIM (16.6 percent), Microsoft (5.2 percent) and Symbian (1.5 percent).

Samsung, which creates mobile Android-based devices, was the handset leader during the three month timeframe with 25.6 percent market share. This was a 0.3 increase from the previous three month period ending August 2011. LG followed with 20.5 percent, Motorola had 13.7 percent, Apple had 11.2 percent and RIM fell in last place with 6.5 percent.

The results hardly seem surprising, since a report from earlier this month stated that Android claims nearly half of the U.S. smartphone market. Also, Android dominated comScore's report ending August 2011 with 43.8 percent market share, leaving Apple in second place with 27.3 percent.

Another unsurprising factor about comScore's report is that RIM has lost market share since the three month period ending August 2011, sliding from 19.7 percent to 16.6 percent in top smartphone platforms and also falling from 7.1 percent to 6.5 percent top mobile OEMs. More than likely, its tumble is due to RIM's October data outage that lasted four days and spanned the U.S., Canada, Europe, South America, Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

Source: comScore



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RE: Holds on. Really?
By Pirks on 12/30/2011 8:19:40 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Do mean like what happened with the iPod
Well, you can't have apps on music player so then you can't play the "more apps is better" game with iPod. But you can play it with Mac, iPhone, iPad and Windows. Which is what I'm doing.
quote:
why, given that the Android market space is now bigger than the iOS market, do developers make nearly four times as much money from the iOS space?
For the same reasons developers made less money with Windows than with Apple back in those early PC days. This did not prevent Windows from winning in the end though.
quote:
on the whole it is a poor way to analyse the world
Yeah, sure, if you hate this particular piece of history which shows Apple's downfall you can ignore it when analyzing the world. However smart people always learn from history, you should know this. Even Apple learned a lot from its real bad past history. You'll never admit this but it's a fact. Jobs has changed a lot since his early days in 1980s, why? Because he LEARNED FROM HISTORY.
quote:
Things seem to be different now but working out how they are different requires nuanced and new thinking
Hey, you also should try new thinking if you want to stop pretending that history does not exist and that parallels with the past do not ever happen. I see this parallel already - another platform is quickly eclipsing the Apple's one in mind share and market share, this happened in the past and this happens again right in front of our eyes. Your own prejudices against this "bad" (for Apple) piece of history do not change the fact that now things are very similar to those in 1990s. You just afraid to admit this because you are afraid of this particular "bad" piece of history.


RE: Holds on. Really?
By Gio6518 on 12/30/2011 10:13:07 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Your own prejudices against this "bad" (for Apple) piece of history do not change the fact that now things are very similar to those in 1990s. You just afraid to admit this because you are afraid of this particular "bad" piece of history.


Of course it's going to repeat, no one can dominate all areas of their product, thats what almost killed Apple in the 90's, just as that tight fisted control killed other products like Toshiba with HD-DVD or Sony with Betamax, I guess Apple stiil haven't grabbed a clue and changed their business practices...

quote:
For the same reasons developers made less money with Windows than with Apple back in those early PC days. This did not prevent Windows from winning in the end though.


Exactly, you can't make more more in the end by marketing to the few, lets say the 20% of Apple people how many of those 20% are going to buy the app...with Android you have almost 3x the people to market the app too...probabaly 4-5x more people in the near future to which they would make far more by sheer volume (Business 101). If indeed they actualy make more money on iOS, then why are developers feverishly porting their once exclusive iOS apps to Android, and Android Market almost at the same number of available apps...Simple marketshare.


RE: Holds on. Really?
By TakinYourPoints on 12/31/11, Rating: 0
RE: Holds on. Really?
By TakinYourPoints on 1/2/2012 6:22:44 PM , Rating: 2
TYP crits downvotes with facts: http://blog.flurry.com/bid/79061/App-Developers-Be...

So many mad people here. Don't blame me for better dev support on iOS than Android, it isn't my fault they think it's not worth putting all their effort into.


RE: Holds on. Really?
By Tony Swash on 12/31/11, Rating: 0
RE: Holds on. Really?
By Pirks on 12/31/2011 6:54:12 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
why in so many metrics does iOS seem to trounce Android
Hey, you didn't forget that Mac OS was ALSO trouncing Windows back in those early PC days, did you? ;)


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