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  (Source: deviantart.net)
Apple took second place with 28.7 percent market share

The latest comScore report shows that Android is still dominating U.S. mobile subscriber market share ahead of Apple's iOS.

The report, which measures mobile market share for the U.S. during a three month period ending November 2011, provides an average among over 30,000 U.S. mobile subscribers.

According to comScore, 234 million Americans age 13 and over used mobile devices in the three month period, and 91.4 million of them are smartphone owners. Android-based devices took the lead position with 46.9 percent share in the smartphone market. Apple took second place with 28.7 percent, followed by RIM (16.6 percent), Microsoft (5.2 percent) and Symbian (1.5 percent).

Samsung, which creates mobile Android-based devices, was the handset leader during the three month timeframe with 25.6 percent market share. This was a 0.3 increase from the previous three month period ending August 2011. LG followed with 20.5 percent, Motorola had 13.7 percent, Apple had 11.2 percent and RIM fell in last place with 6.5 percent.

The results hardly seem surprising, since a report from earlier this month stated that Android claims nearly half of the U.S. smartphone market. Also, Android dominated comScore's report ending August 2011 with 43.8 percent market share, leaving Apple in second place with 27.3 percent.

Another unsurprising factor about comScore's report is that RIM has lost market share since the three month period ending August 2011, sliding from 19.7 percent to 16.6 percent in top smartphone platforms and also falling from 7.1 percent to 6.5 percent top mobile OEMs. More than likely, its tumble is due to RIM's October data outage that lasted four days and spanned the U.S., Canada, Europe, South America, Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

Source: comScore



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RE: Holds on. Really?
By ltcommanderdata on 12/30/2011 11:58:18 AM , Rating: 2
It's undisputable that Android has the largest market share. But the most relevant question to developers and service providers is who are the most active users since this has a more direct bearing on their profitability and sustainability. The results here are quite interesting.

http://blog.flurry.com/bid/79061/App-Developers-Be...

Analysis by Flurry shows that despite the ever increasing Android market share, developer interest in making Android apps has actually decreased since the beginning of 2011. One reason Flurry has found is that the same cross-platform app generates only $0.24 on Android for every dollar that is made on iOS. Eric Schmidt points out that Android's huge market share lead will eventually force developers to be more aggressive in their Android support, but when developers are already making 4x as much money with their iOS apps despite Android's nearly 2x market share lead over iOS, pure market share may not be developers' primary motivation.

http://gizmodo.com/5843461/google-tells-senate-tha...

If it wasn't already clear, iOS users' being more active has been confirmed by Google themselves. In sworn testimony to Congress, Google revealed that 2/3rds of their mobile search traffic comes from iOS. In other words, in their own bread and butter search business, for mobile users, iOS represents 2x as much traffic as Android despite Android's nearly 2x market share.

It would be interesting if comScore tried to do a breakdown on marketshare in the low, mid, and high-end smartphone markets. It may well be that a lot of Android's market share growth is coming from the low-end market where people don't use their device as much or spend as much money. This would explain the poor utilization that Google is seeing in mobile search or developers are seeing in revenue despite Android's raw market share dominance.


RE: Holds on. Really?
By mcnabney on 12/30/2011 1:42:45 PM , Rating: 2
The difference is that Apple users will spend a LOT more money in the App store. Add in that apps generally cost MORE in iOS than for Android and you can see the developers problem. They can make more per sale in iOS. Support is also simpler since there is quite a bit more hardware uniformity versus the 100+ device SKUs in Android. I have about 50 apps on my Android device and I have paid for 13 of them. So my total software cost is probably $50 total. The Apple users I know easily have spent hundreds on apps (more apps than me and paying for almost every one of them). Volume of Android users will eventually change the math, as will the shift to advertisement-supported apps (where willingness to spend money becomes less beneficial). Once RIM and WP7 are gone Android should mature.


RE: Holds on. Really?
By Alexvrb on 12/30/2011 7:40:41 PM , Rating: 2
I think Android has had plenty of time to mature. Not sure what you're implying there. Also if WP and BB are out of the picture, that will be a bad thing for everyone, as the reduced platform competition will hinder advances on the software side. Even the now-defunct WebOS phones had an impact on other phone software, forcing others to look at the things that Palm's WebOS did better, and integrate some of that into their own product. What proud Palm (and later HP) SHOULD have done was license their OS out to every major phone maker out there. Too late now...


RE: Holds on. Really?
By TakinYourPoints on 12/31/2011 3:10:56 AM , Rating: 2
Agreed, especially when it comes to Windows Phone 7. I need something to recommend to people who don't want an iPhone, and it sure as hell isn't Android.

More competition is always better.


RE: Holds on. Really?
By TakinYourPoints on 12/30/2011 8:49:15 PM , Rating: 1
Exactly, iOS development flourishes while Android's continues to flatline. iOS is far more profitable, which is why big game and productivity app developers focus on it so much more than on Android.

There's also the fact that Android isn't getting enterprise deployment while iOS is because it is fundamentally insecure in comparison due to the lower number of ActiveSync security policies it supports (7 versus iOS's 39). Forget games and cooking apps that so many people will write off, this also means far more business software being written for iOS.

Looking at Microsoft, the largest software company in the world, they have focused on iOS development since 2008 while largely ignoring Android. They currently have 17 iPhone apps and 9 iPad apps, the last releases being a Skydrive app and an Xbox Live app. Office for iOS is currently in development. The best Android gets are things like a Bing app.

The risk/reward currently seems to be against MS developing for Android, and this is even with them collecting license fees on those devices. Similar logic trickles down from large developers like id, all the way down to small time developers. There is just more money in iOS, despite there being more Android handsets sold. Combine that with the fragmented OS and hardware ecosystem Android has and the effort isn't worth it for a surprising number of developers.


RE: Holds on. Really?
By TakinYourPoints on 12/30/2011 8:54:20 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
It would be interesting if comScore tried to do a breakdown on marketshare in the low, mid, and high-end smartphone markets. It may well be that a lot of Android's market share growth is coming from the low-end market where people don't use their device as much or spend as much money. This would explain the poor utilization that Google is seeing in mobile search or developers are seeing in revenue despite Android's raw market share dominance.


I suspect that this is the case, it is the best explanation for the huge difference in app revenue and internet traffic.

Either way, the Android vs iOS rivilry is irrelevant given that both are increasing sales in an expanding market. The casualties are RIM (RIP), Symbian (who cares), and Windows Phone 7 (sadly). Marketshare for all three are contracting at the expense of Google and Apple.


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