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  (Source: Satan's Laundromat)
Apparently you can't run your operating system into the ground and expect a full refund

How much does Hewlett-Packard Comp. (HPQ) think its leftovers are worth?  Apparently $1.2B USD, according to VentureBeat.

HP allegedly in mid-2011 asked various parties if they were willing to pay it $1.2B USD for the remains of webOS/Palm.  That's a pretty gutsy move given that HP paid $1.2B USD for Palm in 2010.

Considering that defunct CEO Léo Apotheker and HP's sage board then proceeded to run webOS into the ground, finally terminating its product lineup and cleaning house of both the engineering staff and pro-webOS managers, that's a pretty ambitious figure to be floating, to say the least.  This is hardly atypical thinking at HP of late, though -- consider this is the company that seriously considered cutting out the heart of its business -- consumer PCs -- and only reconsidered after being smacked with shareholder class action lawsuits and public outcry.

Palm RIP
[Image Source: Gigaom]

Sadly HP appears to have been smacked hard with reality.  Samsung Electronics Comp., Ltd. (KS:005930) -- thought to be one of the potential buyers HP approached -- laughed at the prospect of such a sale insisting it would never buy webOS.  Well, it would certainly never buy it at $1.2B USD -- that's for sure.

HP's recent woes have few parallels in the technology industry, but are at least remarkably similar to those of Research in Motion, Ltd.'s (TSE:RIM) and its flaccid executive squad.  Both companies were once remarkably profitable, but have seen a veritable train wreck of recent events and have struggled as shareholders blasted them for drooping profits.

Recent reports indicated that HP might end up getting nothing for webOS, opting instead to offer the legacy ultra-mobile OS as open source software.  But other reports quote HP's new CEO Meg Whitman as saying that HP "could" launch new webOS tablets in 2013.

Sources: VentureBeat, TechCrunch



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HP Seems to Have the Competency of a Government Agency
By Arsynic on 12/29/2011 3:27:37 PM , Rating: -1
WTF???

You'd think they were a start-up that got "Stimulus" cash from the Obama administration. That's how inept they've been lately.




By CZroe on 12/29/2011 3:34:44 PM , Rating: 2
As a firesale HP TouchPad owner, all I can say is that I would have paid twice as much for it if they had unlocked the bootloader and promised Android at that price. Who knows: It may have saved WebOS. Even now, I stay in WebOS unless I need to do something that requires Android. The Blackberry PlayBook would be 10x more appealing to me if there were a promise of proper Android should the device or the OS or the company go defunct, so it only makes sense to me to promise it if the only other option is to admit defeat. Instead of throwing it on a similar fire sale and out-right losing as much as possible on the failure, they should consider allowing Android and factoring that value into the clearance price. It may protect their reputation for security as there would then be no reason to hack it to get Android on there, as if Dingleberry and the Android Market on QNX/PlayBook hacks weren't embarrassing enough.


By ChronoReverse on 12/29/2011 3:49:43 PM , Rating: 2
I played with my firesale Touchpad for a couple weeks before putting it down and not really using it.

Now that I have Android (xron-modded CM7.1) on it, the thing is actually useful as a secondary device for around the house use (my desktop is still my goto though).


By NullSubroutine on 12/29/2011 4:57:59 PM , Rating: 2
Having Android on my TP only adds the usefulness like Netflix and books (because the epub reader on WebOS is broken). Really if HP had stayed with it and got some numbers out there we could see software like Netflix coming out for it increasing its value.

I really prefer the layout of WebOS over Android for the tablet, I just wish it had the same software as it.


By kleinma on 12/29/2011 5:30:20 PM , Rating: 3
For the most part I find the touchpad to be slow and unresponsive. It was released near the same time as the iPad 2, for around the same price, and was no where as usable. The hardware is heavy and clunky. I don't hate it, but that is because I paid 99 bucks for it. I would never have wanted to pay anything more. It was just a half assed attempt to release something to compete with the iPad. It is really no wonder there is little competition in the tablet space. These mfgrs just put out "me too but not so much" devices that are pretty much crap. I am not an apple fan, and don't want an iPad, but it is the clear market leader because everyone else (except maybe samsung) is putting out pure crap at the same price as the good stuff. WebOS has a few nice features that set it apart, but finger flicking multitasking is only worth so much...


By JasonMick (blog) on 12/29/2011 6:44:08 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
For the most part I find the touchpad to be slow and unresponsive. It was released near the same time as the iPad 2, for around the same price, and was no where as usable. The hardware is heavy and clunky. I don't hate it, but that is because I paid 99 bucks for it. I would never have wanted to pay anything more. It was just a half assed attempt to release something to compete with the iPad. It is really no wonder there is little competition in the tablet space. These mfgrs just put out "me too but not so much" devices that are pretty much crap. I am not an apple fan, and don't want an iPad, but it is the clear market leader because everyone else (except maybe samsung) is putting out pure crap at the same price as the good stuff. WebOS has a few nice features that set it apart, but finger flicking multitasking is only worth so much...

The UI had some novel features like the card multi-tasking selector and dismissal, but I generally agree with you.

If you do a fair amount of modding with preware, you can get it pretty nice, but as far as out of the box experience, it's worth about what you and I paid for it -- $99 (or actually mine was a bit less with extra discount).

I have to say, too, the app selection -- particularly with free apps -- is horrible. I literally downloaded every free game in their app store that looked decent, and I don't have that many games. Hard to really enjoy a tablet when it has hardly any apps. (And yes, I literally went through EVERY free app in fact, in one sitting, which says something sad about their app selection...)


By ChronoReverse on 12/29/2011 6:56:02 PM , Rating: 2
Even with all the tweaks the experience is very marginal. The web browser, for instance, allows you to open pages in a new card but it wouldn't actually load until you've switched to it (negating the whole point). It also doesn't help that it's broken on many common sites (like gmail and hotmail) back when I was still using WebOS.

Even the vaunted card multi-tasking is pretty much just bling-bling when it comes down to efficiency. Task Changer in Android allows me to "alt-tab" with a single gesture which is more efficient that the swipes in WebOS in a 2 app situation. Cards also get unwieldy if you have several open which means the long-press Home icon view of Android is also more efficient.


By Samus on 12/30/2011 2:02:32 AM , Rating: 2
I got the 32GB for $150. I would have paid $250 knowing what I know now and how much I use it, but at the time, I agree the out of box experience of WebOS on the TouchPad (and my Veer) were terrible. Slow, unresponsive, no UI customization, etc. Preware fixes all of that, but in the end, there are still very few apps because HP bailed on the thing literally while continuing to sign up developers.


By retrospooty on 12/30/2011 7:16:33 AM , Rating: 2
"but finger flicking multitasking is only worth so much... "

Ya, agreed, on the touchpad. It's alot more useful on a phone, where you can hold it with one hand and easily flip between tasks with the other. There is no substiture for having one hand free =)


By rs2 on 12/30/2011 9:35:31 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
I have to say, too, the app selection -- particularly with free apps -- is horrible.


Gee, I'm sorry those *free* apps weren't to your liking. I suppose you could have always tried the paid ones. But no, that supports the idea that software developers should actually be compensated for the effort they put into coding all those apps.

And we can't have that, can we? It's the developers' job to spend their time providing you with free entertainment while expecting nothing in return, no?

Better yet, if you feel the existing set of free apps is not to your liking, why not make your own free app? I mean, it can't be that hard to do, right? All those developers with the "horrible" free apps must just have no idea what they're doing.


By Belard on 12/30/2011 10:59:27 AM , Rating: 2
The Touchpad came out about 4 months after the iPad 2 and sold for the same price as an iPad2 but with many many features lacking... It performs worse than a ipad1 even though it has a camera, it might as well not even have one. Stupid stuff like that; releasing a half baked products how you sink your product / brand. There were a lot of things to like about the TB... The keyboard with numeric keys is a big plus. Hopefully Apple will add it to iOS one of these days... Same with android.

I compared the TB to my iPad1 and I didn't like the quality of the TB, but the screen was fine. Read the review on Anandtech for the good and bad.

From this rumor... It seems HP sent the Touchpad out to the public to die. HP has been doing stupid things ever since they fired their SMART CEO over nothing. They are a clown company that WILL not live 5 years, except perhaps as a printer company. They have become today's Commodore, a joke managed by idiots who are making more money than they are worth. They are the only venders of the dead Itainium platform, their desktops are no better than anyone else's, nor their prices. I stopped buying HP printers about 8 years ago because of bloatted drivers and crapware... Really, 1GB HD space for a multifunction printer?! ( in 2003)??? I just need the damn thing to print and scan. And let's not even start on thier crappy India tech support.

There are other companies that do better, make better products and support thier customers.

HP, die.


By mugiebahar on 12/30/2011 9:48:50 AM , Rating: 2
I have an Android tablet and the Playbook and the Touchpad, my wife has an Ipad. The best one is the Touchpad then Ipad. Ipad has way better software support, but as to the OS WebOS is way better then all the others. I never touch my Android tablet anymore and Playbook is for business to link with my phone just to make it easier. But for a person who uses multiple platforms (in computers I use OSX/Windows/linux) I really wish the never gave up on WebOS. New computers with touch screens in a couple of years would really kill on that platform. It is the single best end user OS with GUI that I have ever seen that got kicked (in the balls per se) way too fast. All I can say good thing they got ride of Leo A-poo-fukn-tugger as CEO. What a douche bag. If your Touchpad is running slow run the uber kernal and over clock to 1.5 and get rid of fluff stuff (like the wave ripple when you touch the screen) its really good with all that crap gone.


By torpor on 12/30/2011 11:07:17 AM , Rating: 1
OK, that bit about Chrysler and GM being saved needs to get the truth treatment.

Chrysler is now a foreign company - it's owned by Fiat. I have a hard time calling that "saved".

GM would have gone into bankruptcy proceedings, which would have allowed the company to free itself from contracts and certain debts under a reorganization scheme permitted under US law. The company would not have gone away, cars would still be made and people would still be employed.

Instead, bankruptcy would have ended the union contracts holding GM back from competing on price and quality, and the contracts could have been recast in a way appropriate for the 21st century. GM could have come out stronger, and in good shape for years to come.

Instead, under direct supervision of the Obama administration and Car Czar Rattner, a new company called General Motors Holding was created, and all worthwhile assets were transferred to it as well as all union contracts. All the idol plants and environmental cleanups were left with Old GM. In the new company, most ownership rights were split between the US government, the Canadian government, and the UAW.

(Go ahead, try to find the value of current GM stock in July, 2010. You can't, because it didn't exist until November 2010.)

So in truth, the GM that existed before is no more. That company is not in operation and builds nothing. There is a new company with a similar name that carried on.

This effectively screwed bondholders and small businesses owed money by GM. These people, in bankruptcy proceedings, would have been first in line to receive compensation/stock in the new company from the court proceedings. Instead, they got nothing. And GM is left saddled with paying people $70,000+ per year, with executive-style benefits, to hang doors on cars.

If you look at GM stock performance, it’s dropping. Because the same structural problems that kept it from succeeding before are still in place.

What bankruptcy would have fixed, Obama prevented.
That’s not saving; that’s prolonging the inevitable.


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