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Some desktop and notebook barebones drives will have their warranties slashed from 5 years to 1 year.

Last week, Western Digital revealed that it was cutting the warranty on its Caviar Blue/Green and Scorpio Blue drives from three years to two years. Now, it looks like Seagate just couldn't stand by and let Western Digital have all fun when it comes to cutting hard drive warranties.
 
The Register is reporting that Seagate is upping the ante by slashing some warranties from five years down to one year. Here are some of the "highlights" of the warranty cuts:
  • Constellation 2 and ES.2 drives: 5 years reduced to 3 years
  • Barracuda and Barracuda Green drives: 5 years reduced to 1 year
  • Barracuda XT: 5 years reduced to 3 years
  • Momentus 2.5-inch (5400 and 7200rpm): 5 years reduced to 1 year
  • Momentus XT: 5 years reduced to 3 years
The new warranty policy will go into effect on December 31, 2011. According to The Register, Seagate made this move "to be more consistent with those commonly applied throughout the consumer electronics and technology industries."
 
By aligning to current industry standards Seagate can continue to focus its investments on technology innovation and unique product features that drive value for our customers rather than holding long-term reserves for warranty returns."
 
If manufacturers and consumers ever had any doubts before about embracing solid state drive (SSD) technology, maybe now is the time to start making the shift to rid us all of spinning media.

Sources: The Register, PC World



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Contributing to life expectancy.
By drycrust3 on 12/18/2011 2:12:49 PM , Rating: 2
At one time I worked at the call centre of a computer manufacturer, and we were told that there had been a court case in America (I'm not American) where the life expectancy of a HDD was the main issue, and at the end of the case the judge decreed that a HDD should be able to last at least 18 months. Thus, the maximum you should expect from a HDD manufacturer is an 18 month warranty, anything above that is at their own discretion.
One cause of HDD "failures" that isn't a manufacturing defect is the way the computer is handled, e.g. dropping the computer can easily cause a problem, but customers usually want the replacement to be done under warranty.
I did some research on HDD failures, and one of the contributing factors to shorter life was the frequency of turning it on and off, with frequent power on cycles appearing to contribute to failures. Apparently places like Google, with tens of thousands of the things, had found they extended the HDD life by keeping the drives running instead of turning them off when they weren't being used.
On top of that, my supervisor at the computer company commented that he'd never seen computer brought in which had a Linux operating system on it, only those with Windows on it, which made him wonder if some of the "HDD failures" were actually caused by viruses and malware, and not by a manufacturing defect.
Thus, when you consider the susceptibility of a HDD to customer related causes of failure, and that from a PR point of view a manufacturer should overrun the warranty period (e.g. accept a failure as an "in warranty" failure even though you received the item just outside the expiry time) a year to two years warranty is about all you can expect.




By its tom hanks on 12/18/2011 6:03:34 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
On top of that, my supervisor at the computer company commented that he'd never seen computer brought in which had a Linux operating system on it, only those with Windows on it, which made him wonder if some of the "HDD failures" were actually caused by viruses and malware, and not by a manufacturing defect.


1. someone who uses linux most likely will not be using a call center or repair service, so therefore it'd only be likely that windows or mac users would be. mac users hand their bank accounts over to apple geniuses to solve things, so they won't typically be using a call center or repair service outside of apple either, thus only windows users are likely to be the vast majority using a call center/repair service, but by no means the only ones with failed hdd's

2. viruses are not unique to the windows operating system, contrary to a certain local troll's "statistics". your boss is ill-informed about malicious software and spreading the rumors he heard in the apple commercials


By wallijonn on 12/19/2011 2:54:32 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
one of the contributing factors to shorter life was the frequency of turning it on and off, with frequent power on cycles appearing to contribute to failures. Apparently places like Google, with tens of thousands of the things, had found they extended the HDD life by keeping the drives running instead of turning them off when they weren't being used.


And if you don't turn off the PC everyday then you run the risk of getting "pop-corning" capacitors and possible data loss (along with the possibility of the power supply dying) due to loss of AC (power failure) and brown outs. There's also the chance of fans going bad and the CPU heat sink getting clogged with dust. But it's usually the capacitors which either short out or bulge, along with leaking fluid.

One is therefore left to choose between swapping out the HDD or getting a new motherboard.


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