backtop


Print 64 comment(s) - last by Just Tom.. on Dec 16 at 8:48 AM


  (Source: BBC)
Two separate experiments at the Large Hadron Collider bring scientists closer to elusive building block of Universe

For a week, anticipation has been building for the press conference held this morning by scientists from the European Organization for Nuclear Research in Switzerland. Speculation abounded that they would announce evidence of the misnamed "God particle," the Higgs boson, which gives all matter mass.

So, now that 8 a.m. ET on December 13, 2011 has passed, are we any closer to finding the so-called God particle? Well, maybe.

According to the BBC, researchers at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Switzerland say that two experiments there may have resulted in glimpses of the Higgs boson. However, they do not have enough evidence yet to make a solid claim.

So why all the fuss? 

"The Higgs is the final piece of the Standard Model of Particle Physics which is, itself, the crowning achievement of subatomic physics. Called the 'God Particle' by some, the Higgs is responsible for giving all the other flecks of matter in this Universe the remarkable property we think of as mass. Physicists have been hunting the Higgs for decades," explains Adam Frank at NPR's 13.7 blog.

Evidence of the Higgs would be one of the most significant scientific advances in 60 years. 

The two separate experiments at the LHC — Atlas and CMS — have been searching for the basic building block of the Universe independently. "Because the Standard Model does not predict an exact mass for the Higgs, physicists have to use particle accelerators like the LHC to systematically look for it across a broad search area," the BBC reports.

Both experiments have reportedly seen a data "spike" around a mass of 125 Gigaelectronvolts. While this isn't enough to confirm the Higgs' discovery, it is enough to generate mass excitement (pun definitely intended) in scientific circles.

Perhaps now all the citizens CERN recruited to help find the Higgs can go back to their day jobs.

Sources: BBC, NPR



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Woohoo
By FITCamaro on 12/13/2011 11:12:59 PM , Rating: 1
Well when believers in the One Ring form a nation, they can teach about it in schools all they want. In the meantime, America is a nation formed by men of the Christian faith who had absolutely no problem with it being taught in schools. I supposed BS classes like "diversity awareness" are far more educational to students....

Hell these days we have groups who want to get rid of higher math and science courses because they're "unfair" to minorities who tend to do poorly at them.


RE: Woohoo
By ClownPuncher on 12/14/2011 1:25:55 PM , Rating: 2
Public school teachers have the right to teach history of religion in history classes. My senior year we had speakers from several organized religions offering perspective and background on their religions. There was no proselytizing, a fair account of each was given.

The deistic majority of the Founders also wanted a separation of church and state - yet many schools in their time were offered by local churches, not usually the state government.

You also have the right to attend a private school of your chosen religion.


RE: Woohoo
By SlyNine on 12/15/2011 12:23:31 PM , Rating: 2
But what does any of that matter.

The argument is about whether religion should be taught like science, As a fact kind of thing.

How would you teach creationism, because the only way I can think of would be using a lot of circular logic (its true because I say it doesn't make sense any other way)

Religious people use just about every logical fallacy in the book to make their points. How are you going to teach it with out doing so?? Give me an example of evidence supporting creationism that doesn't involve faith or that stands up to the same demands that teaching a science would have to live up to.


“So far we have not seen a single Android device that does not infringe on our patents." -- Microsoft General Counsel Brad Smith

Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki