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  (Source: BBC)
Two separate experiments at the Large Hadron Collider bring scientists closer to elusive building block of Universe

For a week, anticipation has been building for the press conference held this morning by scientists from the European Organization for Nuclear Research in Switzerland. Speculation abounded that they would announce evidence of the misnamed "God particle," the Higgs boson, which gives all matter mass.

So, now that 8 a.m. ET on December 13, 2011 has passed, are we any closer to finding the so-called God particle? Well, maybe.

According to the BBC, researchers at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Switzerland say that two experiments there may have resulted in glimpses of the Higgs boson. However, they do not have enough evidence yet to make a solid claim.

So why all the fuss? 

"The Higgs is the final piece of the Standard Model of Particle Physics which is, itself, the crowning achievement of subatomic physics. Called the 'God Particle' by some, the Higgs is responsible for giving all the other flecks of matter in this Universe the remarkable property we think of as mass. Physicists have been hunting the Higgs for decades," explains Adam Frank at NPR's 13.7 blog.

Evidence of the Higgs would be one of the most significant scientific advances in 60 years. 

The two separate experiments at the LHC — Atlas and CMS — have been searching for the basic building block of the Universe independently. "Because the Standard Model does not predict an exact mass for the Higgs, physicists have to use particle accelerators like the LHC to systematically look for it across a broad search area," the BBC reports.

Both experiments have reportedly seen a data "spike" around a mass of 125 Gigaelectronvolts. While this isn't enough to confirm the Higgs' discovery, it is enough to generate mass excitement (pun definitely intended) in scientific circles.

Perhaps now all the citizens CERN recruited to help find the Higgs can go back to their day jobs.

Sources: BBC, NPR



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RE: Woohoo
By lagomorpha on 12/13/2011 2:28:09 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
Including it in Biology, though, is ridiculous as it has nothing to do with science.


The trouble with religious people is that they actually believe their beliefs correspond with reality and that revelation supersedes reason. From their perspective, the Bible/Quran is science.


RE: Woohoo
By lamerz4391 on 12/13/2011 3:15:11 PM , Rating: 2
Holy crap. Nice generalizations, tool. That post is just FULL of ignorance if you think that all "religious people" think exactly alike.

Grow the hell up and realize that there are different shades of what people choose to believe. Until then, you just look like an idiot.


RE: Woohoo
By KaTaR on 12/13/2011 4:31:16 PM , Rating: 2
Yes there are different shades. There are 2.1bn people who think the Chrisitan god exists. There are 1.5bn who think the 2.1bn are completely wrong and are going to hell for being Christian. There are another 1.5bn people who think the 2.1bn and 1.5bn are wrong and that people get reincarnated. You get the picture.

Although the thinking and belifs are different there are several common traits that bind them together. First, they cannot offer any meaningful evidence that support their core assertions (heaven, hell, god, reincarnation). Second, they have fought, killed, and died by the thousands in the name of their beliefs.


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