backtop


Print 49 comment(s) - last by Masospaghetti.. on Dec 6 at 9:40 AM


Volt side impact crash
GM is going to great lengths to make Volt owners happy

GM and its extended range EV called the Volt have been under fire lately for vehicles that caught fire after crash testing. GM has so far pointed out that it hasn't received any reports of the Volt catching fire in an actual accident despite the incidences in crash testing. The drama surrounding the Volt started in the middle of November when the NHTSA conducted a side impact crash test on a Volt and then parked it in the parking lot.
 
The Volt sat there for three weeks before catching fire and burning hot enough to damage other vehicles nearby. The resulting fire after three weeks was linked to the battery packs used in the Volt and the NHTSA kicked off an investigation into the Volt. Three more Volts were obtained and out of those three subjected to the same side impact crash tests with simulated rollovers; two of them had more issues. One of the cars caught fire within seven days of the test and the other started smoking and throwing sparks immediately after the test.
 
GM has been upfront with buyers so far and has even offered loaner cars until the investigation is complete to any Volt owner that is worried about the risk of fire. GM has now sweetened the deal with GM CEO Dan Akerson saying in a recent interview that GM would purchase back any Volt from an owner that requested it. So far, none of the Volt owners has asked GM to buy their car back.
 
GM did note that out of the roughly 6,000 Volts sold it had received about 230 calls from concerned owners and that so far 33 Volt owners have asked for loaner cars. GM spokesman Selim Bingol has said, "We're going to do what it takes to make every consumer completely satisfied."
 
Despite the issues with the Volt and possibility of fire, the car still has the highest satisfaction rate in the automotive market at 93% of owners saying they would buy the car again. That is higher than the 91% satisfaction that owners of the Dodge Challenger and Porsche 911 have expressed.

GM has also noted that it will not hit its 10,000 unit mark for the Volt this year. GM has sold 6,142 Volts so far. Even with the battery fire publicity the Volt sold more than 1,108 units in November for its best month ever. The Volt is selling so well now that some in Washington are wanting to end the $7,500 tax credit the Volt offers.

Source: The Detroit News



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Shouldn't the car be written off ?
By n00bxqb on 12/2/2011 1:46:38 PM , Rating: 5
AFAIK, the side crash test that the NHTSA does would basically write any car off (plus, most insurance companies offer a replacement option as optional insurance for cars that are a few years old or younger) and if it takes a week or more after impact for the car to be a fire hazard, it shouldn't be a problem for the consumer (though the junk yards would definitely need to be aware).

They really ought to test several dozen more cars to see if there is a real risk to the consumer of the car catching fire shortly after impact. If there is none, it really shouldn't be a huge issue.




RE: Shouldn't the car be written off ?
By tng on 12/2/2011 5:17:48 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
They really ought to test several dozen more cars to see if there is a real risk to the consumer of the car catching fire shortly after impact. If there is none, it really shouldn't be a huge issue.
Well I don't think that it really should matter if it is immediate or 3 weeks later, it is a safety risk for someone. If not the driver/passenger then the people at the body repair shop, scrap yard...

Why would you need to test several dozen cars? So far there have been issues with 75% of the tests, think it will change unless GM does a redesign? After GM does some mods then test a dozen.


By Masospaghetti on 12/4/2011 8:50:01 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Well I don't think that it really should matter if it is immediate or 3 weeks later, it is a safety risk for someone


By this standard (cannot be a hazard to anyone at anytime, under any circumstance), no vehicle (new or old) would ever be allowed to exist.


"DailyTech is the best kept secret on the Internet." -- Larry Barber














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki