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Exynos 5250 SoC is based on Cortex-A15 architecture

The mobile market is heating up with consumers flocking to smartphones and tablets in record numbers. Samsung is looking to strengthen its position in these markets thanks to the new Exynos 5250 SoC which is the follow-up to the Exynos 4210 used in the popular Galaxy S II.
The Exynos 5250 is built using a 32nm low-power HKMG (High-K Metal Gate) process and is based on ARM Cortex A15 architecture. The dual-core Exynos 5250 operates at a speedy 2GHz and has twice the processing performance of 1.5GHz, dual-core Cortex A9 processors according to Samsung.

But CPU performance isn't the only thing that's been improved; Samsung says that the Exynos 5250 delivers four times greater graphics performance than Cortex A9 designs (memory bandwidth has doubled to 12.8GB/sec). It also adds in Stereoscopic 3D functionality and support for resolutions up to 2560x1600 (WQXGA).
The Samsung Exynos 5250 SoC is being targeted at the tablet market and will go into mass production during Q2 2012.

Sources: Samsung, SammyHub

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RE: Incremental improvement
By omnicronx on 11/30/2011 1:55:31 PM , Rating: 2
I have my doubts that pushing tablet resolutions will have such an effect until long after higher resolution screens are implemented in tablets. Neither OSX nor Windows have true resolution independence (i think OSX is further along, and have some kind of half baked implementation). Until they do, and developers actually implement it, everything on your screen will shrink as you increase the resolution of the display.

iOS is somewhat there, i.e even if they double the resolution, the size of the objects on the screen should not shrink or become destorted. (aside from situations such as a dev using non vector imaging like a bitmap)

This allows for higher resolutions on smaller displays, while still keeping everything readable for the vast majority of situations.

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