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Diesel cars are plentiful in Europe

As the demand for more efficiency in vehicles increases with the government and some consumers in the U.S., some drivers are starting to consider vehicles that previously weren't popular options. One of the efficient options that consumers are starting to take notice of is the diesel engine. Clean diesels are one of the technologies that several major automakers are now looking into.
 
The Detroit News reports that as of now diesel sales in the U.S. are less than 3% of the total sales, which is expected to change. One of the new diesel vehicles coming to the market is from a domestic manufacturer; Chevrolet will introduce a diesel version of Cruze in 2013. For GM, bringing the diesel Cruz to the U.S. has little risk since it already sells diesel cars in other countries.
 
The Chevrolet Cruze Diesel will arrive in '13 

Other automakers are looking to diesel cars as well with Mazda expecting to launch a new diesel engine in 2013, and the recipient is likely to be the all-new CX-5 small crossover utility vehicle. German automakers Volkswagen, Audi, BMW, and Mercedes all offer diesel-powered vehicles in the U.S.
 
Some suppliers to automakers like Robert Bosch LLC are predicting that diesel sales will grow to be 10% of the U.S. market over the next decade. Diesel cars are very popular in Europe where gasoline is expensive and diesel is more cost effective.
 
And it's not only economy cars that will be going diesel -- some performance cars are moving to diesel engines. BMW is expected to launch a diesel version of the M5 next year.
 
Mazda is widely expected to bring a diesel version of the new CX-5 to the U.S. 

The big draw for diesel engines is that the engines are often more durable, produce more torque, and they are 20 to 30% more efficient.

Source: Detroit News



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RE: definitely.
By FITCamaro on 11/28/2011 1:45:55 PM , Rating: 0
You were good until you spit out your crap about "big oil".


RE: definitely.
By corduroygt on 11/28/2011 2:40:46 PM , Rating: 2
Plus there are disadvantages to diesels, such as a usually heavier and more complicated engine. The block and the pistons would last forever but the turbos and the high pressure DI systems have higher maintenance costs.


RE: definitely.
By Spuke on 11/28/2011 10:15:16 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The block and the pistons would last forever but the turbos and the high pressure DI systems have higher maintenance costs.
There is no maintenance on these systems.


RE: definitely.
By corduroygt on 11/29/2011 1:00:24 AM , Rating: 2
I consider "replacing it when it breaks" as maintenance :)


RE: definitely.
By Spuke on 11/29/2011 2:37:48 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I consider "replacing it when it breaks" as maintenance :)
This tech is already proven in pickup trucks and class 7/8 commercial tractors. I'm not worried and I have put my money where my mouth is and purchased a DI, turbo vehicle. I have nearly 100k on it and have only had one recall (rear differential seal) and a failed thermostat. It's the most reliable car I've ever owned. My so-called "less complicated" previous cars have had WAY more problems.


RE: definitely.
By JediJeb on 11/30/2011 1:24:35 PM , Rating: 2
If you consider that a diesel needs no ignition system then they are only as complicated or maybe less complicated as an equivalent gasoline engine. Used to be diesel engines were dirt simple compared to gasoline engines even with a turbo. My father was a school bus mechanic for 30 years and he was never so happy as when they switched from gasoline engines to diesel engines, and even didn't complain when they began to add computer engine controls to them, always said they were much better to work on.


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