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  (Source: dieselpowermag.com)
NHTSA pushes for the mandate to save lives while opponents such as the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers reminds it of costs associated with implementing the rule

New regulations that require automakers to improve rear visibility in all new models by 2014 were proposed in December 2010, and now, the backup camera rule is part of the national debate about safety, federal regulations, and jobs.

The backup camera rule would require the installation of backup cameras in all new vehicles by 2014. It was proposed by President Barack Obama, and is a response to the Cameron Gulbransen Kids Transportation Act, which is a 2008 law named after a young boy who was accidentally ran over by his father's car.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), about 292 people die from back-over accidents per year. By implementing the backup camera rule, half of those lives would be saved annually.

While the backup cameras could clearly be beneficial, the topic is up for debate because opponents say the requirement would be too costly and would result in job losses.

According to an August 30 letter the president sent to House Republican leaders, the backup camera mandate is in the top five list of the five most costly rules under consideration at this time.

The backup camera rule could cost as much as $2.7 billion, and would equate to about $18.5 million per life saved. Adding the cameras to vehicles would tack on an extra $58 to $203 per vehicle.

"Congress built flexibility into this law to balance safety and cost, and unfortunately NHTSA has ignored Congress by mandating an expensive, one-size-fits-all solution for rearview cameras," said Gloria Bergquist, spokeswoman for the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers.

So far, individual automakers have not said anything negative about the rule despite these costs. In fact, Ford plans to have backup cameras in all Ford and Lincoln models by the end of this year.

The backup camera plan calls for 10 percent of the United States' new fleet to meet standards by 2012, 40 percent to meet the standards by 2013, and all new vehicles to comply by 2014.

Source: The Detroit News



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RE: Personal Responsibility
By corduroygt on 11/25/2011 5:57:52 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
I think your response shows a complete lack of compassion and understanding. In one sense you are right, if you are reversing you should be checking your mirrors, and all the children should have been inside, and someone should have been supervising the vehicle while it was backing, and the driveway should be straight and not curved, and someone should have been standing by the pavement to warn people there is a vehicle backing, and the vehicle should have had a warning buzzer sounding, and there should be overhead lighting to ensure there is adequate visibility 24 hours a day for all seasons of the year, etc, etc, etc. Or maybe you should park on the street, or have a driveway that has a separate entrance and exit, so you don't need to reverse at all.

No it just requires common sense and personal responsibility. Make sure you know where your goddamn kids are when backing up or take them indoors. Why the f*** do I have to pay for a rearview camera because some dumbass ran over his kid? I don't even have any kids!

You can't control everything in life so occasionally some kids will get run over by idiot parents backing up. I bet that dad makes sure to check behind the car before he's backing up now.


RE: Personal Responsibility
By michael67 on 11/26/11, Rating: -1
RE: Personal Responsibility
By GuinnessKMF on 11/26/2011 8:59:47 PM , Rating: 5
Sheesh, after reading your post all it made me think was that they should take the money and spend it on education, anything so I don't have to read this type of crap anymore.


RE: Personal Responsibility
By drycrust3 on 11/26/2011 1:14:42 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Why ... do I have to pay for a rearview camera because some dumbass ran over his kid? I don't even have any kids!


If you consider that you already pay taxes, and a fair amount of that, directly and indirectly, goes into the cost of bringing up children, then why object to something that protects the investment already made in that child and yet potentially doesn't cost you anything as a tax payer?
Since children are currently being hit by a reversing vehicles, then you are already paying for their hospitalisation or death. So unless the injury is just a scratch the cost of that injury (or death) is going to be more than the cost of fitting the camera, thus potentially the cost to you is less by fitting the camera.


RE: Personal Responsibility
By corduroygt on 11/26/2011 1:35:22 PM , Rating: 4
I'd like to see how you came to that conclusion. 14 Million cars a year * 200 bucks = 2.8 Billion dollars a year would be the extra cost of this measure. It'll be useful in protecting 100-150 kids from their idiot parents. I'm sure letting those 100-150 kids die costs less, and also forces people to pay attention when they're driving and not letting such idiots breed is always a plus.


RE: Personal Responsibility
By yomamafor1 on 11/28/11, Rating: 0
RE: Personal Responsibility
By corduroygt on 11/28/2011 5:10:49 PM , Rating: 2
It's unreasonable to expect everyone to pay for it because you were stupid and made a mistake. Rear view cameras are options on many vehicles and those 100-150 people can just get one for their own vehicle without forcing it on everyone.


RE: Personal Responsibility
By BobfromLI on 11/26/2011 6:02:29 PM , Rating: 2
I just picked up a used Expedition. My son put in a fancy radio and we felt we needed, NEEDED a way to see what was behind us. The camera cost $14 retail. If there were no screen like the one that is used on nav systems, retail cost of systems is about $120. I figure that auto companies can do it alot cheaper. Even if I don't hit a kid, I might not hit another car or the fire hydrant my wife fought with (and lost to) two years ago.


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