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Print 19 comment(s) - last by alpha754293.. on Nov 28 at 2:14 PM

Will Pentium replace Celeron as low-end name?

Intel's Pentium line of processors has been around over a decade now. The Pentium processor was the high-end of Intel's line of processors for notebooks and desktops earlier in its life. Today the Pentium line is placed between the high-end Core series and the low-end Celeron parts. Intel, however, is aiming a new processor for its Pentium line at the server market.
 
The new processor is the Pentium 350 and is aimed at low-end servers. The dual-core Pentium 350 runs at 1.2GHz, features 3MB cache, and has a low power draw of 15W. The processor is a bare bones part with no integrated graphics. Intel is targeting the chip at microservers rather than high-end servers where performance is key. That market is served by other parts in the Xeon line. 
 
TechWorld reports that a new line of Xeon X3 servers are also supposed to come to market soon that are based on the Atom processors for micro servers. Analyst Dean McCarron for Mercury Research says that the Pentium 350 might also find its way into servers for specific tasks like printing or document sharing. 
 
He said, "What we're seeing is a repurposed part."
 
TechWorld seems to think that the part might be a sign that the Celeron line will be replaced by the Pentium name. 

Source: TechWorld



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RE: Seems Foolish
By nocturne_81 on 11/28/2011 3:34:24 AM , Rating: 2
ARM servers aside.. I don't see the point with the popularity of virtualization nowadays.. One well powered 3U server could probably create 16 equally performing VPS's, I'd imagine at a much lower power stake, space usage, and overall price.


RE: Seems Foolish
By alpha754293 on 11/28/2011 2:04:27 PM , Rating: 2
The thing is though - a 3U system can consume around 400-500 W of power. Even with 95 W TDP processors, whereas a dual-core, 15W processor would put it at 7.5 W/core vs. 15.83 W/core. So already, it would be twice as efficient.

And for a lot of "front-line", customer service reps (like bank tellers), they really don't need super powerful systems, but they do need the bandwidth (memory and network) for their secure bank teller application; all in the size of of a 10-25-disc CD case.

And you can package such systems in a much denser configuration using the same 3U volume.


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