backtop


Print 24 comment(s) - last by nocturne_81.. on Nov 23 at 2:55 PM


  (Source: marccus.net)
For 2011 so far, BlackBerry has 32.2 percent of the business market while iPhone has 45 percent

BlackBerry phones have been known for their business use, but a new survey indicates that this is no longer the case. The new business smartphone of choice is the iPhone.

The survey was conducted by enterprise mobility provider iPass, which obtained a quarterly Mobile Workforce Report from 2,300 enterprise workers.

According to iPass' results, BlackBerry has slipped to second place in the business realm. Only 32.2 percent of the mobile worker market consists of BlackBerry phones while 45 percent of this market uses the iPhone.

Last year, BlackBerry had 34.5 percent of the mobile worker market while the iPhone only had 31 percent.

Creeping up behind the iPhone are Android-powered devices. In 2010, Android only had 11.3 percent of the business market, but this year, it climbed considerably to 21.3 percent.

Nokia sits at fourth place with only 7.4 percent of the enterprise market. Last year, it was at 12.4 percent.

Overall, 95 percent of mobile workers currently use smartphones, and of this 95 percent, 91 percent use their smartphone for work. These numbers have increased from 85 percent and 69 percent respectively in 2010.

BlackBerry's fall to second place may not seem too surprising to some. Just last month, Research In Motion (RIM), developer of BlackBerry devices, experienced a four-day outage that left many around the world without BlackBerry services. This affected many mobile workers who depend on these services to keep their businesses running. The outage started in Europe, the Middle East, India and Africa, then spread to North America, Canada and Latin America.

Source: Byte



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Those numbers mean squat
By petschska on 11/18/2011 8:19:38 PM , Rating: 3
Although you're statistically 100% correct, Makaveli is implying that there's a bias in the selection of the sample, which is still a valid argument. If random business users were polled, then as FormulaRedline states, the sample size is more than sufficient. I do appreciate you bringing some science to the argument instead of generalizations.


"When an individual makes a copy of a song for himself, I suppose we can say he stole a song." -- Sony BMG attorney Jennifer Pariser














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki