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Ford Focus Electric
Ford Focus Electric won't come cheap

We first brought you news of the production Ford Focus Electric earlier this year when it was officially unveiled at CES 2011 in Las Vegas. Now, Ford has spilled the beans on how much the all-electric car will cost when it debuted next year.
 
According to Ford's new online price configurator/reservation page, the Focus Electric will have a base price of $39,200 plus a destination charge of $795 bringing the total to $39,995. Since the U.S. government is handing money out left and right for "green" vehicles, the price of the Ford Focus Electric drops to $32,495 after a $7,500 federal tax credit.
 
To put this pricing in perspective, the all-electric Nissan Leaf has a base MSRP of $36,050 while the Chevrolet Volt has a base MSRP of $39,995. Both of those figures are before the $7,500 federal tax credit is taken into consideration.
 
The Focus Electric is powered by a 123hp (181 lb-ft torque) electric motor and a 23 kWh lithium-ion battery pack that was co-developed with LG Chem. Top speed for the vehicle is a relatively meager 84 mph.
 
There’s no word on how far the Focus Electric will go on a charge, but we’re guessing that it will be targeting the Nissan’s Leaf’s EPA rating of 73 miles on a charge.

Source: Ford Focus Electric Homepage



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By Samus on 11/3/2011 10:53:30 AM , Rating: 2
The Focus FEI gets 40MPG highway and clearly electric cars aren't targeted at highway drivers.

Using a more conservative 30MPG city figure (the FEI does get 32MPG city, but thats on the high-end of the spectrum for city mileage in a car this large) the real advantages come in for stop-and-go traffic.

Aside from the fact that the electric will be a magnitude cheaper to operate for inner-city traveling, it will undoubtedly be more reliable (one moving part opposed to hundreds) and its modular design of accessories will be cheaper to maintain.

The lithium battery pack will probably last 10 years, 7 of which are under warranty. So thats a non-issue. ~15% of Americans hold onto their cars for more than 8 years. 50% replace their vehicles when they are out of warranty, or apx. every 4 years.

The car is clearly a good buy for certain people, and like all electric cars, isn't marketed at the general population. Stop dissing something you don't understand.

Vehicles like this make sense for fleet, livery and short inner-city commute.

The national average for electricity is 8 cents/kWh, not 13 cents. Inner city areas have cheaper electricity (9 cents here in Chicago) because power is usually nuclear. Rural areas, where this car makes zero-cents anyway, have more expensive electricity (usually fosil-fuel) although thats changing as wind power is being rapidly deployed in rural areas, at least here in the Midwest.


By Dr of crap on 11/3/2011 12:46:40 PM , Rating: 1
Thanks for that post.

I agree city driving is the ONLY place EVs make sense.

And I'm glad you posted 50% get a new car every 4-5 years.
Another reason that EVs AREN'T for the average driver.
You can't recoup the cash layout in 5 years.
But then you can't recoup normal new car prices at that time either!


By Spuke on 11/3/2011 4:47:42 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
But then you can't recoup normal new car prices at that time either!
The reason why people bring that subject up is because the pro-EV crowd uses that argument to support EV "superiority" over gasoline cars. I personally believe if you can make it work then that's all that's needed. But some seem to need to "bash" another's purchase in order to feel good about their purchase. Especially since snobbery is now en vogue.


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