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Ford Focus Electric
Ford Focus Electric won't come cheap

We first brought you news of the production Ford Focus Electric earlier this year when it was officially unveiled at CES 2011 in Las Vegas. Now, Ford has spilled the beans on how much the all-electric car will cost when it debuted next year.
 
According to Ford's new online price configurator/reservation page, the Focus Electric will have a base price of $39,200 plus a destination charge of $795 bringing the total to $39,995. Since the U.S. government is handing money out left and right for "green" vehicles, the price of the Ford Focus Electric drops to $32,495 after a $7,500 federal tax credit.
 
To put this pricing in perspective, the all-electric Nissan Leaf has a base MSRP of $36,050 while the Chevrolet Volt has a base MSRP of $39,995. Both of those figures are before the $7,500 federal tax credit is taken into consideration.
 
The Focus Electric is powered by a 123hp (181 lb-ft torque) electric motor and a 23 kWh lithium-ion battery pack that was co-developed with LG Chem. Top speed for the vehicle is a relatively meager 84 mph.
 
There’s no word on how far the Focus Electric will go on a charge, but we’re guessing that it will be targeting the Nissan’s Leaf’s EPA rating of 73 miles on a charge.

Source: Ford Focus Electric Homepage



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By YashBudini on 11/2/2011 5:56:25 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The Ford Electric will likely get 3 miles per kWh

Here we pay appx 20 cents/kwh, so figure 7 cents per mile.

Gas at $3.60/gallon divided by 40MPG = 9 cents a gallon (highway only), can be twice that in stop and go traffic in the winter. But then factor in ICE maintenance, oil changes can account for as much as 1 penny per mile, transmission fluid changes, air filters, spark plugs, timing belts, as applicable.

I wonder how soon people stealing power right off the pole becomes a major problem for utilities companies. That's not even addressing grid capacity issues.


By Keeir on 11/2/2011 6:31:09 PM , Rating: 2
Read the OP remark? I was using his values

Of course here we pay .08 dollars per kWh, so you know that varies all across the world and the US.

quote:
I wonder how soon people stealing power right off the pole becomes a major problem for utilities companies. That's not even addressing grid capacity issues.


Doom and gloom! You know the big TV craze? or even the original TV craze?

An electric car is likely to use ~11 kWh a day. Adoption rate suggests that at most 500,000 will be added a year for the forseable future. A large plasma TV that is on 8 hours a day will add more than 10 kWh a day to electric bill of a home. Yet I hear no one pronouncing gloom even though people buy millions of ever larger/hungier electronics ever year.

Even at 20 cents/kilowatt hour, the 12,000 mile average driving will amount to just 800 dollars a year. Far below what the average person pays for gas right now at (12,000/25*3.6)= 1,700. (Your numbers, mine are significant greater difference. Today I would pay 320 electric versus 1920 gas in my current car.)


By YashBudini on 11/2/2011 7:48:47 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Read the OP remark? I was using his values

Whatever. I never invalidated them. I was simply adding another example for comparison purposes.

quote:
A large plasma TV that is on 8 hours a day will add more than 10 kWh a day to electric bill of a home.

I informed a friend that his TV was using over 1 horsepower 750+ watts just to watch the news.

quote:
Doom and gloom!

Are you sure you've addressed the state of the US grid to any degree? Even 65 inch plasmas take a back seat to electric resistance heaters, hot water heaters, electric dryers, and soon some number of EVs.


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