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Compute Unit (click to enlarge)

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Sources claim TSMC's manufacturing is that good

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) is the world's largest semiconductor foundry, and as such is constantly under pressure from its customers and competitors. The company recently announced that its newest 28nm process has entered mass production. Smaller process geometries typically mean that a faster, smaller, and cheaper processor will be available.
 
Two of TSMC's biggest customers are AMD and NVIDIA. Both have taped out GPU designs using TSMC's 28nm High Performance (28HP) process. AMD's next-generation GPU series is codenamed Southern Islands. The Tahiti GPU is supposed to launch early in December, while NVIDIA's Kepler GPU will launch in February of 2012.
 
28HP is the first process from TSMC to use High-k Metal Gate (HKMG) technology, as opposed to the typical silicon oxynitride (SiON) found in 40nm GPUs. HKMG uses a material with a high dielectric constant instead of the traditional silicon dioxide gate dielectric. This allows for a substantial reduction in gate leakage, thus lowering overall power consumption and allowing for higher clock speeds.
 
According to sources within TSMC, the 28HP HKMG process is doing very well. So well, in fact, that it supports up to a 45 percent clock speed improvement over the firm's own 40G process used to make the last two generations of video cards. This speed improvement is based on the same leakage per gate, but the GPU firms may choose to favor lower power consumption over a pure speed boost.
 
Our AMD contacts declined to respond to these assertions and directed our attention to a presentation made in June at the AMD Fusion Developer Summit by Eric Demers, the Chief Technology Officer of AMD Graphics.
 
The flip side of the manufacturing process is the architecture and design, and AMD has already previewed the basis for its future graphics architectures, known as Graphics Core Next (GCN). The basic design of GCN will form the foundation for the next few generations of AMD graphics processors.
 
The fundamental unit of AMD’s previous designs has been the Streaming Processor, utilizing a Very Long Instruction Word (VLIW) architecture designed to take advantage of Instruction Level Parallelism (ILP). That will be supplanted by the Compute Unit, comprised of multiple 16-wide vector Single Instruction, Multiple Data (SIMD) units designed for Thread Level Parallelism (TLP).
 
L1 and L2 caches will support the CUs, while the GPU will have access to the main system memory. Support for C++ programming has been added, making it easier to program for the GPU and CPU within the same application.

While all of these changes will benefit compute applications, it is not yet clear what impact this will have on current games and those already in the pipeline. The architectural changes may end up helping or hindering performance. Nevertheless, the entire 28nm graphics lineup will support resolutions of up to 16000 x 16000 pixels.
 
Of course, yields have always been a big problem with introducing a new node. TSMC had significant challenges with its 40nm process, leading to shortages of the Radeon HD 5800 series. HKMG processes typically use atomic layer deposition for high-k materials, which has been a challenge even for Intel.
 
Ultimately, we know that the next-generation of GPUs will be "significantly" faster, but the effects of the new architecture are still unknown and could change things positively or negatively. The better the performance, the more likely it is to sell out. The final clock speeds are still being determined, so final performance numbers will have to wait until the first official launch. The latest word on the street is December 6.


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My GTX580 is still not even stressed
By Mithan on 11/4/2011 3:32:30 PM , Rating: 2
I don't really care about Keplar to be honest. My GTX580 hasn't even been stressed at all with Rage or BF3 and under than Metro2034, I doubt anything coming out in the next 6 months will push my video card to where the frame rate starts to drop with max options at 1920x1200.




By bug77 on 11/4/2011 4:02:54 PM , Rating: 3
Thank consoles for that. They make sure almost every PC title also has to run on ancient DX9 hardware.


By lecanard on 11/4/2011 6:32:29 PM , Rating: 2
I bet you are not turning on the most demanding graphical option: 3D. I've been looking for something that can play Metro 2033 on max settings in 3D, and not finding anything up to the task, and certainly not affordably. So we can definitely do with some faster cards. At this point a 3D monitor is much cheaper than the cards needed to support them.


RE: My GTX580 is still not even stressed
By macca007 on 11/4/2011 8:14:50 PM , Rating: 2
I have 2x 480 cards in SLI which is slightly faster than a 580 in most programs, You are not turning everything up to max settings if you say you can run everything fine. Instead of just cranking up ingame settings try going to Nvidia control panel and overide application settings, You might get a shock just how slow some of those games become. lol

The other point has been mentioned, A lot of pc games are just console ports using direct x 9 unfortunately, So it doesn't push pc to it's limits.

Bring on 28nm cards from both AMD/ATI and Nvidia, Finally a worthy upgrade instead of just an overclock!


By retrospooty on 11/5/2011 10:43:21 AM , Rating: 2
"You are not turning everything up to max settings if you say you can run everything fine"

Agreed, either he isnt using Max settings on Textures and AA, or isnt aware that the 580 is fully taxed and operating at 100% of its ability. It may be running decent at high detail settings, but it's definitely taxed.


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