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It took so long because its original but it'll make millions in first two days says 3DRealms

By now, almost every gamer has heard about Duke Nukem Forever (DNF), a title that was herald as the next great first person shooter. The game was suppose to be released back in the 90's and was suppose to be the hot successor to Duke Nukem 3D -- a game that became a classic in its own right. DNF arguably had a lot to live up to. Duke 3D had become a pop culture icon, with the protagonist throwing out memorable lines during a fire fight and the game itself delivering a unique style of game play.

It's now eight years later and with an investment of nearly $8M USD, DNF is still not finished -- but it's almost done, says Scott Miller, CEO of 3D Realms. In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Miller explains that his company focuses on original IP, or intellectual property. This is to say that 3D Realms develops only original game ideas and game content. The company does not take ideas out of movies, or any other type of source to develop their games. We won't be seeing a Spiderman game, an X-Men game, a Matrix game, or any sort of Hollywood rip-off here; just original creativity says Miller, and this is why it's taking DNF so long to be released.   When asked by THR if a game should take as long as DNF took to complete, Miller responded "It shouldn't. And I'm dumbfounded myself. A huge part of the problem is that it's really hard hiring good developers to come to Dallas. This place used to be a hotbed of game development. But, nowadays, people seem to want to go to Austin instead. Plus we have this reputation now -- that our games don't ever come out, so ... "

Miller also speaks about 3D Realm's other greatly anticipated game, Prey. The game is another 3D first person shooter but is much further along in its release schedule than DNF. In fact, Miller says that Prey was under development for nearly 4.5 years. According to 3D Realms, Prey will be available for both the XBOX 360 and the PC.

Update 05/12/2006: The title and summary have been corrected to better reflect Miller's statements.


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RE: Ripoffs
By BaronMatrix on 5/14/2006 12:48:26 PM , Rating: 2
You can't patent a line from a movie. Especially if hte line can be said in many different situations. Arnold can't stop anyone from saying "I'll be back." That's why Scary Movie can do whatever they want. Now they can't record the line and play it, though.


As far as DNF, I saw a preview of it on Ars. They say it will be played in a browser window using Ajax. They also said that it took so long because they changed engines 3 times and then came up with a proprietary one.

Supposedly the strippers are there and they are even hotter than before.


RE: Ripoffs
By patentman on 5/15/2006 8:54:31 AM , Rating: 2
You can't patent a simple phrase because its nota machine method of manufacture, process, product etc.... as required by 35 U.S.C. 101. MOreover, its highly unlikely you could even copyright a simple phrase like "I'll be back" because the U.S. copyright office is very coincerned with "tying up the English language" by allowing these types of phrases to be copyrighted.

As fpor the strippers in DNF, I sure as hell hope they look better thent the pixelated sprites in DN. And not that graphics are the be all and end all, but in a modern shooter, unless the game is designed to look completely unrealistic (e.g. XIII), I want at least some eye candy. It would be very humorous to me if everyone got all up in arms about DNF coming out and then it has graphics vaunting circa 1999 technology.


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