backtop


Print 57 comment(s) - last by bh192012.. on Oct 31 at 2:30 PM


  (Source: E*TRADE/YouTube)
The study found that 52 percent of children ages 5 to 8 years old have had access to a mobile device while 39 percent of 2 to 4-year-olds and 10 percent of zero to 1-year-olds have had access

For years, media such as television and video game systems have been used as babysitters for younger children. But as technology advances and more gadgets are introduced, mobile devices like smartphones and tablets are being used for the same purposes.

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit group that focuses on the use of technology by children, prepared a study called "Zero to Eight: Children's Media Use in America." As the study suggests, it describes the amount of media children ages zero to eight consume via mobile devices and television.

The study looked at 1,384 parents with children up to 8 years old from May 27, 2011 to June 15, 2011.

Let’s start with television. According to the study, nine-month-olds spend almost an hour per day watching television or DVDs. Children under the age of two spend twice as much time watching TV and videos as they do reading books at 53 minutes and 23 minutes per day respectively. In addition, 30 percent of zero to 1-year-olds have a TV in their bedroom while 44 percent of 2 to 4-year-olds and 47 percent of 5 to 8-year-olds have a TV in their bedrooms as well.

As far as computers go, 53 percent of all 2 to 4-year-olds have used a computer and 90 percent of all 5 to 8-year-olds have used a computer. The average age of first use was around 3 and a half.

The newest group of gadgets to be introduced to youngsters is mobile devices like smartphones and tablets. According to the study, 29 percent of parents have downloaded apps specifically for their children on their phones. On average, 11 percent of the children used a cell phone or other mobile device for media consumption for about 43 minutes per day.

When it comes to both computers and mobile devices, the study notes that there is a "digital divide" among those in different income brackets. In the computer realm, 72 percent of children up to age 8 have a computer in their home. Among low-income families (less than $30,000 per year), this number is at about 48 percent where higher-income families (over $75,000 per year) are at 91 percent.

In addition to the digital divide is the "app gap," where 27 percent of lower-income families include a parent with a smartphone where 57 percent of higher-income families include a parent with a smartphone. Thirty-eight percent of lower-income parents don't even know what an app is where only 3 percent of higher-income parents are unaware.

Overall, the study found that 52 percent of children ages 5 to 8 years old have had access to a mobile device while 39 percent of 2 to 4-year-olds and 10 percent of zero to 1-year-olds have had access.

The study can be found here.

Source: MSNBC



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 11:58:16 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
In addition, 30 percent of zero to 1-year-olds have a TV in their bedroom


Are you serious what child under 1 needs a television in their room let alone 30%. I find this absolutely ridiculous.




RE: Wait what?
By AlvinCool on 10/28/2011 12:09:49 PM , Rating: 2
There are schools of thought that playing certain multimedia for your child from birth can boost their IQ and/or start their brain development earlier in life. I don't know if it works but it seems to be a trend. Try a search for baby Einstein.

Regardless a pad would allow you to play songs and certain visual media that would be soothing to a baby. Lets face it they hang all kinds of crap that makes noises and stimulates hand eye coordination, why is a tablet to stimulate learning so odd.


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 12:12:05 PM , Rating: 2
The tablet learning is not odd to me I understand that. The tv is the bedroom does not make sense to me.

I have heard of the baby Einstein stuff but I thought that was all music and sounds not visual things.


RE: Wait what?
By Solandri on 10/28/2011 1:47:11 PM , Rating: 3
It was disavowed recently by the AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics). Kids can't comprehend what they're seeing on TV until they're about 2 years old.

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/10/infant-t...

The jury on tablets is still out. They can be interactive rather than purely passive, so may help. We just haven't had enough time for studies on it.


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 2:10:29 PM , Rating: 2
Ok that is what I thought.


RE: Wait what?
By kleinma on 10/28/2011 12:22:29 PM , Rating: 2
Yes look up baby einstein and see all the articles about how studies show it does nothing but give kids ADD just like all other TV young kids watch, and does nothing to actually make kids smarter.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby_Einstein#Controv...


RE: Wait what?
By bh192012 on 10/31/2011 2:30:39 PM , Rating: 2
Except what all these studies leave out is that cause does not equal effect here. If you are cleaning the house and you have a baby looking at the ceiling, they're not learning either. We end up comparing kids who have grandma helping v.s. kids who don't have her helping.

My kids watched stuff like that and they are the top studets at their grade level. They have excellent vocabularies and test 2 grade levels above their classmates in reading/writing. It's not because they watched that stuff, it also didn't hurt them.

What does hurt kids is ploping them down in front of the television INSTEAD of spending time with them. It should not be a substitute for human contact.


RE: Wait what?
By AnnihilatorX on 10/30/2011 7:04:20 AM , Rating: 2
According to Ars Technica kids are watching too much TV; if they're under two, any TV is too much

http://arstechnica.com/science/news/2011/10/kids-a...


RE: Wait what?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 10/28/2011 12:15:28 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah, it seems very odd to me. In fact, it seems completely ludicrous.


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 12:20:36 PM , Rating: 2
I honestly don't see any reason a kid needs a tv in his/er room EVER. I think it makes more sense to have a playroom and have a tv in there so they can choose to play or watch a movie or both. But a tv in the bedroom to me is a big NO


RE: Wait what?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 10/28/2011 12:23:21 PM , Rating: 3
I know I'll get rated down by the parents on these boards, but I also don't see the need for those TV screens mounted in the ceilings/headrests of SUVs/minivans.

Parents think they can just slap some headphones on their kids, pop in a DVD, and let the kids zone the **** out so they can get some "peace".


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 12:27:00 PM , Rating: 2
I can see some benefit to that. My family when I was younger drove down to Florida every year from Maryland. I think a tv like that to have more options to keep your kid entertained on really long car trips is a good idea. But not pop in Spongebob for the 30 min ride to the store.


RE: Wait what?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 10/28/2011 12:36:21 PM , Rating: 2
Hey, I'm a "get off my lawn" kinda guy ;)

In my day, I read books and played with Transformers or Technic Legos in the car on long trips:)


RE: Wait what?
By Mitch101 on 10/28/2011 12:58:43 PM , Rating: 2
What Transformers and legos are choking hazzards why a lego could break off during a bump and decapitate you today. Kidding on the hysteria of helicopter bubble wrapped parents of today.

I and one of my kids cant read in the car. The motion causes us to feel ill. We do try to get them to color, draw, and play with clay, still a little young for MadLibs. Keep in mind seat belts were optional growing up. The days of wrestling with your brother in the back seat and facing the people behind you making faces are gone with seat belt laws and common sense in protecting our kids. But things are different than the days of playing Punch Buggy and having 255 Air Conditioning.

On long drives we do purchase new games for the kids Nintendo DS (Depending on grades is whether they get 1-2 games for the ride) and the games allow them to play together over wireless. I have two movie tablets which I try to load up with their favorite TV programs and few movies to keep them entertained. Were starting to let them text with their friends its pseudo writing skills and communicating with others is important or we just tell ourselves it is to justify it. Our cars are just mobile entertainment centers.

But I understand your attachment to how as kids you stared out the window waiting for the next Pedro Says and dreamed dad stopping at Stuckeys for fireworks. Its just a different generation.

I will say we try to force our kids outside. A bit before gaming took over there was whiffle ball, frisbee, and tag football if you were hurt playing tackle.

Im dreading the days of your not going out wearing that to my daughters. For now I can only instill fear about them growing up.


RE: Wait what?
By ClownPuncher on 10/28/2011 1:05:54 PM , Rating: 2
I know, we had lawn darts and machetes to play with when I was young. Most of us lived, and lived to be successful


RE: Wait what?
By jimbojimbo on 10/28/2011 3:15:40 PM , Rating: 2
It's strange how most people wear helmets when riding a bicycle these days when absolutely nobody wore one back in the 80s! Oh, the good old days setting up ramps on the top of staircases so we can fly longer... I don't think this happens any more.


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 3:17:06 PM , Rating: 2
It's cause parents remember their bruises and don't want them on their kids.


RE: Wait what?
By ClownPuncher on 10/28/2011 6:17:40 PM , Rating: 2
Bruises make you smart. Unless they are on your brain.


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 6:30:02 PM , Rating: 2
Exactly


RE: Wait what?
By gmyx on 10/28/2011 2:20:46 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
On long drives we do purchase new games for the kids Nintendo DS (Depending on grades is whether they get 1-2 games for the ride) and the games allow them to play together over wireless. I have two movie tablets which I try to load up with their favorite TV programs and few movies to keep them entertained.

Seems like really long drives but we never bring these along. You don't really need these instant gratification devices all the time.

quote:
But I understand your attachment to how as kids you stared out the window waiting for the next Pedro Says and dreamed dad stopping at Stuckeys for fireworks. Its just a different generation.
Because we let it be that way instead of making them see all there is including technology.

quote:
I will say we try to force our kids outside. A bit before gaming took over there was whiffle ball, frisbee, and tag football if you were hurt playing tackle. Im dreading the days of your not going out wearing that to my daughters. For now I can only instill fear about them growing up.

That is simple - turn off the damn devices!

The problem with these devices is we are allowing our kids to sit around all day. What I've read in the article it seems some "parents" start this habit from day 1. My 6 year old is only allowed a total of 60 minutes of TV a day. After that the TV is off. In summer he usually goes outside because there is more to do out there. He loves my smartphone (Angry Brids and Driving Games) but he knows it's always a short term device. He will spent much more time with Legos than anything else. This is because we habituated him to that. He didn't see a TV program until he was 2 - and didn't care for them until he was 4.


RE: Wait what?
By Mitch101 on 10/28/2011 2:45:33 PM , Rating: 2
I don't see it as a problem. Stare mindlessly into space or try to spark their brains solving problems.

Most of the games they play are collaborative. Im in the process of setting up a Minecraft server for the kids in our community that do this. Its interesting the imagination they have in a virtual space. I wouldnt say its mindless its creation and imagination. Possibly some building block to engineering.

I like that they have determination to finish things through to the end or work together with their friends to accomplish a task. Neither of my kids are overweight my wife tells me our one daughter practically has abs and the other is a whiz on

I dont believe in hard regime of 60 minutes of television its not the military. Even kids need to unwind and accomplish nothing.


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 2:49:58 PM , Rating: 2
For me it depends on the technology and the time of day. If it is something that stimulates their mind then they can do it on rainy days, night, or when friends are sick. But television is different I see that as an night time activity for a limited amount of time. Not 60 min on the dot but also not all night

The Minecraft idea is really cool that you are doing that


RE: Wait what?
By ChronoReverse on 10/28/2011 1:30:21 PM , Rating: 2
I learned to concentrate and amuse myself without needing the aid of "things" because I got nothing while in the car (and I had to ride 20 minutes to school every day in elementary).

<get off my lawn mode>Kids are so spoiled these days</get off my lawn mode>


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 1:58:06 PM , Rating: 2
Trust me I feel the same way. I can just see the benefit of it being used. I too used to play with action figures and had my old school Gameboy to play. I know my car will never have a tv in it. There will be a max of two tvs in my house one for the family room and one for the playroom none shall be in any bedroom


RE: Wait what?
By theapparition on 10/31/2011 11:52:32 AM , Rating: 2
In my day, seatbelts weren't mandatory, and neither were carseats. I played many of time in the footwell while the parents were driving, obviously no seat-belt and certainly no car seat.

I doubt you'd do the same with your children. You are going to try to make them as safe as possible.

Technology is no different. We didn't do that when we were young because we didn't have that stuff. Just because we didn't have it, doesn't mean there is need to deprive our children.

This mindset that "they don't need it" is ridiculous. the only thing anyone needs is air, food, water, shelter. You don't need a computer, or a smartphone. Your parents lived without them, so you don't need one either, right?

Studies have shown that the sooner you get technology into childrens hands, the quicker they are to adapt to it. Some are legitimate learning toys, some are nothing but time wasters. You have to sort the wheat from the chaff and find the ones that work for your family. But to dismiss them all is backward minded thinking.

I remember a LONG time ago, before I had kids, a woman co-worker was disgussing a controversial pop star her daughter was listening too. I chimed in that there was no way I was going to let my kids listen to that stuff. At which she asked me how old my kids were. I replied I didn't have any kids. She laughed and told me I had no idea what I was talking about. And years later, she was absolutely right. I had no idea.

So, come back when you have kids and you'll see that your entire pre-conceived notion of childcare is out the window. Trust me.


RE: Wait what?
By nafhan on 10/28/2011 12:50:46 PM , Rating: 2
Maybe it's the perceived attitude you have a problem with? Because, I'm not really understanding your hate for in car entertainment. Honestly, who actually needs a TV at all? Kids spending to much time staring at a TV screen is the problem, not where they're sitting while they do it.

Note: I may be a bad example as I didn't think the cost of built in TV was worth it. We just have a portable DVD player that we bring on longer trips.


RE: Wait what?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 10/28/2011 12:58:04 PM , Rating: 2
It's probably just the perceived attitude. I guess it just fits my idea of how parents are offloading actual parenting onto technology devices.

Kids get put in front of a TV to zone out at home, then in the car, they're given even more time to zone out in front of the TV.


RE: Wait what?
By Hardin on 10/28/2011 12:56:52 PM , Rating: 2
Oh no Brandon, I'm 23 and I am so glad that cars have this. I would be bored to tears on long trips without it. Not all of us can read in the car, I get very sick if I do that.


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 2:14:12 PM , Rating: 2
I'm 22 and I think a TV in the car is stupid. Hell kids have a gameboy they can play, or they can bring action figures. Maybe kids should learn to be creative and use their imagination like our parents used to do.


RE: Wait what?
By MrBlastman on 10/28/2011 2:22:34 PM , Rating: 2
I'm a parent and I won't rate you down. My kid will have NO television in her bedroom... EVER if I can help it and she won't have a television in the car, either. My house is strange though, my Wife and I don't even have a television in our own bedroom. We're an oddity--a one television household.

My daughter, when riding in the car, will get to experience the joys of watching in high-definition, full surround-sound audio the whole car ride... through her eyeballs, while looking OUT THE WINDOW. ;) If she wants something interactive, I _will_ allow her to read books or play a handheld game device (when she gets older)--far better than staring at a stupid screen the whole trip drooling all over her shirt.


RE: Wait what?
By cjohnson2136 on 10/28/2011 2:29:37 PM , Rating: 2
Totally agree and that is what I plan on doing when I have kids later in life


“And I don't know why [Apple is] acting like it’s superior. I don't even get it. What are they trying to say?” -- Bill Gates on the Mac ads














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki