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Luleå, Sweden   (Source: ips.mtu.edu)
Facebook's farm will take advantage of the climate to cool its servers

Server farms produce quite a bit of heat, and require cooling in order to prevent overheating. So what better place to put a server farm than the edge of the Arctic Circle?

Facebook has announced that it plans to build a server farm in Luleå, northern Sweden, which is at the northern tip of the Baltic Sea and 62 miles South of the Arctic Circle.

The farm, which will consist of three server halls that will cover an area as large as 11 football fields, will take advantage of the climate to cool the servers. In other words, the farm will only use air to cool the servers.

According to Mats Engman, chief executive of the Aurorum Science Park, which is working to lure other computing companies to the area for its cool temperatures, the climate in this area is 2C, or 35.6F, on average. It hasn't reached above 30C, or 86F, for more than one day since 1961.

While air can be used to cool the servers, the servers will still need 120MW of power to stay running. But this power requirement will be provided by renewable electricity generated by Luleå river dams.

"The Luleå river produces twice as much electricity as the Hoover Dam does, so 50 percent is exported from our region," said Engman. "There is a surplus of energy, and we can supply more data centers in this area easily."

Facebook is expected to provide more details concerning the Arctic venture in a press conference in Luleå today. This is Facebook's first server farm to be located outside of the United States.

Source: The Telegraph



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Wait just a minute, please
By kjboughton on 10/27/2011 1:37:07 PM , Rating: -1
Whoa, whoa, whoa. Hold the train.

I'm confused.

So, it's not acceptable to cause of the release of "greenhouse" gases which contribute to the "melting" of the polar ice caps (not my position). But it's wholly acceptable to locate your massive server farm, with it's equally massive heat dump, which would, however infinitesimally small, increase the heating of the local environment, thereby contributing the original problem ("melting ice caps"), near the arctic circle?

So they don't contribute to "global warming," which melts the polar ice caps, they propose to locate their massive server farm and it's massive thermal load near the polar ice caps to take advantage of the natural cooling provided?

The ONLY possible gain here is the potential to save the energy due the efficiency losses of the electrical cooling systems that would otherwise be required.




RE: Wait just a minute, please
By Suntan on 10/27/2011 1:49:54 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
The ONLY possible gain here is the potential to save the energy due the efficiency losses of the electrical cooling systems that would otherwise be required.


Captain Obvious has spoken.

-Suntan


RE: Wait just a minute, please
By WeaselITB on 10/27/2011 2:16:54 PM , Rating: 2
I really doubt that anything "green" other than money factored into this decision.

Data center cooling is a HUGE expenditure. Here's a study from 2009 showing it to be 30% of overall energy usage -- http://www.eecs.umich.edu/~twenisch/papers/weed09....

Since that time, servers have gotten more efficient, but denser (e.g., blades, virtualization, etc.), usually leading to a net heat increase (in my experience, anyway).

Saving 30%+ off your annual energy bill of a multi-million-dollar datacenter? Yes please.

-Weasel


RE: Wait just a minute, please
By Paj on 10/28/2011 7:51:00 AM , Rating: 1
RTFA

quote:
But this power requirement will be provided by renewable electricity generated by Luleå river dams.


RE: Wait just a minute, please
By 91TTZ on 10/28/2011 9:55:27 AM , Rating: 2
Your reply didn't address what he's saying. His point is that the datacenters are going to warm up the area, regardless of where power is coming from.


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