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Fisker Karma plug-in hybrid
Fisker says "range varies greatly on the conditions of the road and how you drive the car"

Fisker Automotive's range-extended plug-in hybrid, the Fisker Karma, has received a lower-than-expected EPA rating that falls below the likes of the Chevrolet Volt and the 2012 Toyota Prius Plug-In.

Over the past few years, Fisker Automotive has claimed that its $96,000 Fisker Karma would receive 50 miles of all-electric range. But the official EPA rating has been released, and it says otherwise.

The EPA rated the Fisker Karma at 52 mpg-equivalent (mpg-e) for combined city and highway driving. This means 32 miles of all-electric range and 20 mpg when the gasoline engine takes over.

Fisker Karma

"As with all electric vehicles, range varies greatly on the conditions of the road and how you drive the car," said Fisker in a statement after the EPA ratings were released. "Overall, we are very pleased with the results of the EPA's tests."

Fisker added that the Karma's 52 mpg-e is not far off from the 54 mpg fleet average that the Obama administration expects in 2025, which is still 14 years away.

In comparison, the 2012 Chevrolet Volt has a price tag of $39,995 and an EPA rating of 93 mpg-e with a 37-mile all-electric range, and 37 mpg with the gasoline engine. The 2012 Toyota Prius Plug-In is priced at $32,760 with an expected 87 mpg-e.

Fisker Karma production kicked off in March 2011, and by July, it was reported that Fisker had 3,000 Karma orders and sold out until early 2012. The Karma runs off batteries, and once depleted, it uses a 2-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine to recharge the batteries and run for an extended range.


Fisker Surf

Source: Inside Line



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RE: 20 mpg is pathetic
By Mint on 10/23/2011 4:09:35 AM , Rating: 2
You and others are really missing the point of this car.

This is a PHEV. That 20MPG should used less than 20% of the time. The rest of the time it's in EV mode. Who cares if it's 20 MPG instead of 25 for a few thousand miles a year.

Sure, EVs are generally powered by coal in the US, but it's much better to have pollution emitted away from the densely populated city than within, and eventually we'll move to nuclear/wind/solar. PHEVs take a huge bite out of urban air pollution and reduce dependence on fossil fuels. You don't get both of those benefits with biofuels, diesels, or normal hybrids. They also make more use out of each kWh of battery than a pure EV and let you go on a road trip.

That's why PHEV is the right choice and the way of the future.

(BTW, Fisker is moving to a BMW turbo 2.0L in the near future.)


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