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Fisker Karma plug-in hybrid
Fisker says "range varies greatly on the conditions of the road and how you drive the car"

Fisker Automotive's range-extended plug-in hybrid, the Fisker Karma, has received a lower-than-expected EPA rating that falls below the likes of the Chevrolet Volt and the 2012 Toyota Prius Plug-In.

Over the past few years, Fisker Automotive has claimed that its $96,000 Fisker Karma would receive 50 miles of all-electric range. But the official EPA rating has been released, and it says otherwise.

The EPA rated the Fisker Karma at 52 mpg-equivalent (mpg-e) for combined city and highway driving. This means 32 miles of all-electric range and 20 mpg when the gasoline engine takes over.

Fisker Karma

"As with all electric vehicles, range varies greatly on the conditions of the road and how you drive the car," said Fisker in a statement after the EPA ratings were released. "Overall, we are very pleased with the results of the EPA's tests."

Fisker added that the Karma's 52 mpg-e is not far off from the 54 mpg fleet average that the Obama administration expects in 2025, which is still 14 years away.

In comparison, the 2012 Chevrolet Volt has a price tag of $39,995 and an EPA rating of 93 mpg-e with a 37-mile all-electric range, and 37 mpg with the gasoline engine. The 2012 Toyota Prius Plug-In is priced at $32,760 with an expected 87 mpg-e.

Fisker Karma production kicked off in March 2011, and by July, it was reported that Fisker had 3,000 Karma orders and sold out until early 2012. The Karma runs off batteries, and once depleted, it uses a 2-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine to recharge the batteries and run for an extended range.


Fisker Surf

Source: Inside Line



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Perspective
By Keeir on 10/20/2011 1:22:13 PM , Rating: 3
First, let me say I am very disappointed, these numbers are a good 10-20% less than what I was expecting.

Yet, I think many commentors are ignoring the obvious comparisons. (I especially like comparing the 2 seat Corvette anecotal highway to the 4 seat Karma's EPA combined. The best Corvette gets 19 MPG EPA combined)

#1. This car in terms of form, functions, and price is between compared to something like a 6 cylinder Porsche Panamera

#2. This car is -not- designed for commuters with long commutes... or really any commuter at all.

#3. The baseline concept is to transition the 50-75% of driving that most drivers do away from gasoline onto electricty

If you compare this car the above mentioned porsche over ~100 miles of driving, assuming just 50% is electric on the US standard electrical grid

Panamera will consume ~200 kWh of Gasoline
Karma will consume ~100 kWh of Gasoline, 51 kWh of Coal, 18 kWh of NG, and ~9 kWh of Nuclear/Hydro/Renewables

(I have adjusted for Refining and Transport of gasoline as well as transmission and production of electrity)

Anyway you slice it, the Karma is consuming less fossil fuels per mile (~17%), produces less CO2 per mile (~20%) and reduces the required importation of oil (~50% marginally or ~33% based on import/domestic ratio)

It does so while being able to perform 95% (subjective to be sure) of the Panamera's misson statement. As the ratio of electric driving increases, the ratio's get even better. GM has observed with the similiarly ranged Volt that ~66% of driving is electric...

While the Model S's 160 miles range is also very practical, one really can not ignore the very limitation of 160 miles only unless you have 12-24 hours for a full charge.




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