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Production Toyota Prius C   (Source: CarScoop)
Toyota's Prius C will slot in below the standard Prius

We've all become pretty familiar with the Toyota Prius over the past decade or so. The vehicle is currently in its third generation and still remains the poster child for the hybrid movement. In U.S. trim, the Prius starts around $23,000 and delivers an EPA combined fuel economy rating of 50 mpg.
 
Recently, Toyota expanded the Prius family to include the Prius v and the Prius Plug-in. Now, the fourth member of the Prius family has leaked early in full production trim. The new Prius C is the baby of the family, and is just a few inches longer than the subcompact Toyota Yaris.

According to CarScoop (via leaked brochures), the Prius C is 157.3" long, 66.7" wide, and 56.9" tall. For comparison, the standard Prius measures 175", 68.7", and 58.7" respectively. While the standard Prius gets its motivation from a 98hp 1.8-liter gasoline engine and an 80hp electric motor, the smaller Prius C uses a 74hp 1.5-liter gasoline engine and a 61hp electric motor.

Toyota's new Prius C [Source: CarScoop]
 
Give that the Prius C has a smaller engine, and most assuredly lighter weight, the Prius C tops its larger brother in fuel efficiency. Although official U.S. EPA figures aren't available for the vehicle, the Prius C is rated at 89.4 mpg on the Japanese JC08 driving cycle compared to 83.3 mpg for the standard Prius. Those figures should put the Prius C just shy of 60 mpg on the U.S. EPA cycle.
 
The Prius C is expected to make its U.S. debut at the Detroit Auto Show in January.


[Source: CarScoop]

Source: CarScoop



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RE: 16% better fuel economy
By Wondering Fool on 10/18/2011 1:15:24 AM , Rating: 4
quote:
We would like to stress that the above fuel efficiency numbers should not be used for direct comparison as the Japanese driving cycles differ from the U.S. and European combined measurements. For example, in Japan, Toyota says that the regular Prius returns up to 38 km/lt, which is equal to 89.4mpg and 2.6lt/100km, while the U.S. model is rated at 50mpg combined.


The math they are using is sound:
35.4/30.4=1.16=16%

Prius - 30.4 km/L
1 kilometer=0.6214 mile
30.4km=18.8906miles
1 gal = 3.785 liters
18.8906*3.785=71.5009mpg

Prius C - 35.4 km/L
1 kilometer=0.6214 mile
35.4km=21.9976miles
1 gal = 3.785 liters
21.9976*3.785=83.2609mpg

83.26/71.50=1.16=16%


By UnauthorisedAccess on 10/18/2011 5:46:55 AM , Rating: 2
+1 because I freakin' love math.


RE: 16% better fuel economy
By Solandri on 10/18/2011 8:34:00 AM , Rating: 3
It's still a 16% improvement on the Japanese course, not the EPA course.

The fact that both vehicles rate 80+ mpg on the Japanese course indicates low speed driving without stops. That's where it's seeing a 16% improvement. The EPA course emphasizes higher speed and stop-and-go more.

At high speeds, aerodynamics matter more than weight and rolling resistance. In stop-and-go traffic, the efficiency of the regenerative braking matters more. So a 16% improvement on the Japanese course cannot be used as a reliable prediction of improvement to EPA mileage.


RE: 16% better fuel economy
By RU482 on 10/18/2011 11:11:57 AM , Rating: 2
thank you...I was thinking the same thing


RE: 16% better fuel economy
By 91TTZ on 10/18/2011 2:16:27 PM , Rating: 2
We can't really use that math to determine what the US fuel economy will be since different countries use different tests.

While this car is smaller and lighter, it could be less aerodynamic which would really hurt it on the highway fuel economy tests.


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