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BAE F-35 Helmet  (Source: BAE Systems)
Fancy futuristic JSF helmet still not working

Schools are already in place to train fresh F-35 pilots now that the aircraft are inching closer to actual service duty. However, one thing that was still questionable was the wild looking helmet that is intended to give the pilot a 360-degree view around the aircraft.
 
The problem is that the high-tech helmet that the F-35 program needs is having some significant issues with performance. Specifically, the maker of the JSF helmet, Vision Systems International, has been unable to get high quality images displayed on the pilot’s visor.
 
Since the availability of that fancy helmet is questionable, a contract to create another helmet with less technology crammed in has been granted to BAE Systems.
 
BAE is using a version of the helmet that Eurofighter Typhoon pilots use. The Typhoon display that would be in the helmet is being removed and it is being replaced with a set of night vision goggles and a single eyepiece showing the heads-up display HUD.
 
"BAE Systems Electronic Systems is proud to be a part of the Lockheed Martin team for the F-35 HMD,” said Jim Garceau, vice president and general manager of defense avionics for BAE Systems. “The NVG HMD will enable all aspects of flight operations and it allows us to build on our long history of successful development programs with Lockheed Martin on the F-35, F-16 and F-22 programs.”
 
The helmet will also incorporate the BAE Q-sight and head tracking technology to help with precise weapons delivery. The modular design also allows an upgrade path for pilots to binocular visor-projected displays, alternate image sources, and night vision.
 
The helmet can also be easily modified if it becomes the main helmet for the F-35.

Sources: DefenseTech, BAE Systems



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RE: Waste is still waste.
By Solandri on 10/18/2011 9:26:45 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
"We have one of the HIGHEST corporate tax rates in the world.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tax_rates_around_the_..."

Do you have anything a bit more recent? Considering Bush had a nice little habit of lowering taxes and whatnot?

http://www.oecd.org/document/60/0,3746,en_2649_345...
http://mercatus.org/publication/corporate-income-t...
http://businessroundtable.org/blog/on-corporate-ta...
(The last one has a historical chart which should answer your Bush question.)

The problem is larger multinational corporations are able to avoid a lot of the taxes by offshoring income (the high U.S. tax rate means they do everything they can to assign the income to a different country) and using obscure tax loopholes. It's small businesses which end up bearing the brunt of the high tax rate. In other words, those multinational corporations have taken hatred directed at them for avoiding taxes, and turned it into a high corporate tax rate which mainly hits the small businesses trying to compete against them.

Also, you may see some sites saying the U.S. corporate taxes are a smaller percentage of GDP than other countries. This ignores that taxes overall in the U.S. are a smaller percentage of GDP than in other more socialist countries. Taxes in the U.S. overall are about 25%-30% of GDP. European countries tend to be around 35%-40% of GDP. If you compensate for this and look at corporate taxes as percent of government tax revenue, the U.S. ends up about average, maybe slightly less.

Lower the corporate tax rate, but also close the loopholes. This should get multinational corporations to assign more of their income to the U.S., make it harder to avoid taxes, and help level the playing field with small businesses. You should see corporate tax revenue increase, economic activity increase, and improved competitiveness. Win/win/win. The companies/lobbyists paying for all the tax loopholes, and foreign countries which corporations use to report income are the only ones winning right now.


RE: Waste is still waste.
By Dradien on 10/18/2011 11:09:11 AM , Rating: 2
You're way better with words then I am. I support what you're proposing here. I wouldn't mind a slightly lower corporate tax, if everyone played fair, which companies with money don't do...


RE: Waste is still waste.
By gamerk2 on 10/18/2011 11:27:49 AM , Rating: 2
The saddest part is that Cain, though wrong on the numbers, has the right idea: Lower the rate, and remove all deductions. He screws up by implementing a flat tax though...

FYI: The reason a Flat Tax does NOT work is simple: You would be increasing the tax rate on the poorest americans, puting more of them on government assistance, which costs more then whatever you collect via taxation in the first place. The lower and middle classes drive economic activity, and you want as much money in their pockets to spend as possible.

Thats also why the Stimulus and other economic policies have failed thus far: They focus on the Supply side: IE coorporations, rather then directly giving aid to the populace. A Federal Work Program would have ended this recession by now...

Fixing the tax code is simple: Lower all rates by 10-15%, and remove all deductions. Income gets taxed at the same rate, regardless of source [IE: INVESTMENTS].


RE: Waste is still waste.
By FITCamaro on 10/18/2011 12:41:24 PM , Rating: 2
Again. Fairtax. A national sales tax that EVERYONE pays regardless of how they make their money. Certain items like groceries are exempt. No deductions. No tax returns. No IRS(or at least very little of one).

The poor aren't taxed because they're only buying what they need. But they also don't get thousands of dollars in other people's money. This also takes care of the problem of taxing those who earn their incomes illegally.


"If a man really wants to make a million dollars, the best way would be to start his own religion." -- Scientology founder L. Ron. Hubbard

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