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Print 115 comment(s) - last by johnsmith9875.. on Oct 19 at 10:06 AM


  (Source: Haloz)
"They build a shiny sparkling thing that attracts users and then they control people's access to those things"

You may recall that top video game maker Valve Corp., makers of the Half-LifeCounterstrikePortal, and Left 4 Dead series, as well as the hit video-game distribution client Steam, recently aired some of its titles on Apple, Inc.'s (AAPL) Mac computers for the first time following some teasers.

But while Valve now is vending products for Apple's personal computer platform, it appears like there's little love between the firms.  Valve president and owner Gabe Newell blasted the Cupertino tech giant for its dictatorial approach to the mobile market.

He comments, "I suspect Apple will launch a living room product that redefines people's expectations really strongly and the notion of a separate console platform will disappear.  I'm worried that the things that traditionally have been the source of a lot of innovation are going - there's going to be an attempt to close those off so somebody will say 'I'm tired of competing with Google, I'm tired of competing with Facebook, I'll apply a console model and exclude the competitors I don't like from my world.'"

He continues, commenting that Apple has the "wrong philosophical approach" in its closed model.  

He adds, "I consider Apple to be very closed.  Let's say you have a book business and you are charging 5 to 7 percent gross margins. You can't exist in an Apple world because they want 30 percent and they don't care that you only have 7 percent to play with." 

To be fair, Valve might be being a bit hypocritical here as its Steam is also a closed platform, as the interviewer challenged.  Mr. Newell brushed this question aside, saying that while Steam isn't free, Valve does offer much free engine code and other tools to developers.

David Bluhm, president and chief executive of game company Z2Live, a mobile-focused gamemaker, jumped to Apple's defense after Mr. Newell's remarks, commenting, "I would argue Apple's system is very open but very proprietary ... it's open with their rules."

Source: TechNW: Best and worst of times for games, Valve vs. Apple



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RE: Glad someone sees this...
By davepermen on 10/13/2011 12:08:55 PM , Rating: -1
Well, and both never had this idea if not for apple. And both would never have done that if not for the need of competing with apple. And both would actually have been sued if they would have come up with that idea. Only apple can bring up such things, get away with it, and make it not only popular, but the new baseline for future tech.


RE: Glad someone sees this...
By augiem on 10/13/2011 1:34:45 PM , Rating: 5
Xbox live existed long before Apple's app store. Same model. People need to quit giving apple credit for everything they did not invent. Apple refines, not invents.


RE: Glad someone sees this...
By augiem on 10/13/2011 1:40:44 PM , Rating: 4
oh and gee every single feature phone with java since god knows when has had verizon/sprint/att store where you buy your software... There was no other way!. This was nothing new. Another example of Apple coming to the game late and marketing the hell out of it to the point the ignorant people don't know any better and think they invented it. People have such short memories.


RE: Glad someone sees this...
By Solandri on 10/13/2011 3:22:51 PM , Rating: 5
The model is older than that. Back in the late 1980s, before the Internet really took off, people were getting their online apps and services via walled gardens like AOL, CompuServe, Prodigy, and DELPHI. Once you signed up with one, everything you saw, everything you could do, the people you could interact with, was basically controlled by the company you signed up with.

Then came the Internet, which broke down all those walls. It eliminated the vendor lock-in, made it useless for them to charge extra for their (usually inferior) services, allowed anyone and everyone to see and participate in anything and everything. You could even make your own net-based service if you wanted, which many did with great success (Google, Yahoo, Amazon, eBay, etc).

This was why Windows didn't get a TCP/IP stack until 1995 (a year after the Internet went mainstream) - Bill Gates was convinced the walled garden network model would win out (Microsoft's horse in the race was MSN), and the Internet was just a passing fad. He did what he could to make it harder for Windows users to get on the Internet. After the great networking liberation we experienced in 1994-1995 when the Internet became mainstream, it's really sad to see people flocking back to the walled gardens, not knowing nor understanding what it is they're giving up. At least with Android you can choose to install a different market or download apps and files from the net.


RE: Glad someone sees this...
By MrBlastman on 10/13/2011 5:07:35 PM , Rating: 5
Not all of us were stuck in walled gardens back in the late 80's/early 90's. There were many of us that freely participated in the BBS system, dialing into hundreds or even thousands of different home-built and home-run BBS's, sharing ideas (through message boards!) and sharing software/pictures/audio etc. via the file section... and... get this, even gaming via door games.

BBS's were great, 2400 bps was not. Even still, we learned to live with and love it.


RE: Glad someone sees this...
By MrBlastman on 10/13/2011 5:09:32 PM , Rating: 3
Oh and I forgot to mention that some of these boards even had backdoor access to usenet (through delayed feeds) and... sub-boards that were underground to even the mainstream BBS community that had its own unique community. If you knew the right people or information, you could open those doors too.


RE: Glad someone sees this...
By FaaR on 10/14/11, Rating: -1
RE: Glad someone sees this...
By Dradien on 10/18/2011 10:57:11 AM , Rating: 1
"subject to some random Android manufacturer's good will to update my phone with security patches (often never happens, even on phones as new as just 6 months old),"

..What? My Droid Incredible came out April, 2010, and it just got an upgrade.

Might want to check your facts.


RE: Glad someone sees this...
By MartyLK on 10/13/2011 10:08:36 PM , Rating: 1
Nah...we all prefer to believe Apple created it all and the others are copying them. In fact, Apple has been very lenient with the companies they are suing.


RE: Glad someone sees this...
By Wolfpup on 10/14/2011 10:55:35 PM , Rating: 2
I have to agree. PalmOS was completely open-so was Windows Mobile. I guess Windows Phone 7 isn't? Everything has to go through their store?

Android is at least open, usually (except I guess for AT&T phones...)


"Mac OS X is like living in a farmhouse in the country with no locks, and Windows is living in a house with bars on the windows in the bad part of town." -- Charlie Miller














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