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The photo that Chris White took of his daughter Hazel in the Braehead shopping center  (Source: BBC News)
UK citizen Chris White took his daughter, Hazel, to the Braehead shopping center near Glasgow on Friday and ran into trouble when photographing her within the mall

The U.S. has had its share of photo-related issues when police officers were arresting citizens for videotaping or photographing them while on duty. But a recent incident in the UK took the prohibition of photography to an entirely new level when a citizen was told he was not allowed to photograph his own daughter.

UK citizen Chris White took his daughter to the Braehead shopping center near Glasgow on Friday and ran into trouble when photographing her within the mall.

According to White, he had photographed his daughter eating an ice cream while "looking cute on the back of a Vespa seat at an ice cream bar." He had uploaded the photos to Facebook.

White was then approached by a security guard, who told him to delete the photos he had taken. The security guard also mentioned that there were signs within the establishment saying that photographs were not allowed. Apparently, employees at the ice cream bar had told security that they were suspicious of White for taking pictures at their counter, and had thought that he was also taking pictures of them.

White told the security guard that he had already sent the two photos to Facebook, and that's when the police were called. They took White's information and noted that they could take the mobile phone as well under the Prevention of Terrorism Act. White was then allowed to leave.

A spokesman for the Braehead shopping center assured that the police were polite about dealing with the situation, and that the matter was handled correctly.

"Our priority is always to maintain a safe and enjoyable environment for all of our shoppers and retailers," said the Braehead spokesman. "The member of our security staff acted in good faith. We have a 'no photography' policy in the centre to protect the privacy of staff and shoppers and to have a legitimate opportunity to challenge suspicious behavior if required. However, it is not our intention to -- and we do not -- stop innocent family members taking pictures."

Superintendent George Nedley, of Renfrewshire and Inverclyde division, said a "full review" has been launched in regards to a complaint regarding White's photography incident.

Source: BBC News



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RE: Had it happen to me...
By Fritzr on 10/11/2011 2:45:20 PM , Rating: 2
Yes

They use any tool or method that is not currently seen as "terrorist making plans". I know it is silly, but for some strange reason they continue to ignore the proper procedures published in the "Idiot's Guide to Terrorism"

As for the police reaction; They handle "taking pictures where not permitted by law" just as seriously as if you were "taking pictures where not permitted by law". It is only the security guards who treat the mall & an Air Force base hangar differently.

The mall asks you to delete the illegal pictures and put the camera away.
The base will arrest you on the spot and probably destroy the camera after your trial.

The police don't get called to the mall until you refuse to cooperate with security. The camera will be returned later when the judge permits it.
On base you want the police to rescue you :)

Same offense, the response varies based on how seriously the offense is viewed.


RE: Had it happen to me...
By nafhan on 10/11/2011 3:50:17 PM , Rating: 3
To make my point a little clearer: if I had actually wanted to take a bunch of pictures or video in the mall, I could have done so very easily (concealed camera, etc.). Further, even if pictures are successfully discouraged, I don't see that significantly altering the difficulty of carrying out terrorist type activities in a shopping mall. Asking me (or someone in a similar position) to not take pictures does nothing to increase security. It's pointless from a security perspective, and the "not permitted by law" factor may even be arguable in that situation (in the US, not sure about UK and others).

Your example of a non-public place (military base) doesn't really apply to this situation. If I was wandering around a secure location with a small child and a bunch of recording gear, I would fully expect to be treated a little differently when caught...


RE: Had it happen to me...
By MozeeToby on 10/11/2011 4:51:48 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
As for the police reaction; They handle "taking pictures where not permitted by law" just as seriously as if you were "taking pictures where not permitted by law". It is only the security guards who treat the mall & an Air Force base hangar differently.
Except it wasn't "taking pictures where not permitted by law" it was "taking pictures where not permitted by mall policy". Mall policy does not hold the weight of law, mall policy does not involve the police, and mall policy does not give them the right to threaten confiscation of property and deletion of data. Mall policy does give them the right to ask you to leave, but that's about all. Taking photos in a public space (even a privately owned public space) is not illegal.


RE: Had it happen to me...
By Reclaimer77 on 10/11/2011 4:58:46 PM , Rating: 4
In America, yes, you're right. Apparently in the UK if you break mall policy you're a terrorist or something.

What a pile of suck it would feel like to live in a place like that.


RE: Had it happen to me...
By voodoochile123 on 10/12/11, Rating: 0
RE: Had it happen to me...
By Natch on 10/12/2011 8:41:05 AM , Rating: 3
Exactly.

Loved this quote, in the article:
"We have a 'no photography' policy in the centre to protect the privacy of staff and shoppers and to have a legitimate opportunity to challenge suspicious behavior if required."

My response to that would be, "Fine. Turn off all your security cameras too, then."

They would likely refuse, stating that those didn't count. Funny how the rules change, when you show them the ridiculous side of their nature, isn't it?


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