backtop


Print 62 comment(s) - last by EasyC.. on Oct 11 at 10:55 AM

IPhone 4S pre-orders began Friday, October 7

The iPhone 5 was a long-awaited follow-up to the iPhone 4, but when Apple made its official announcement last week, many customers and investors were disappointed to find out that an iPhone 4S would be this month's newest mobile release. But that didn't stop Apple from achieving one million iPhone 4S pre-orders within the first 24 hours of pre-order availability.

The problem many had with the news of the 4S was the relatively few changes made since the iPhone 4 -- especially in the realm of external changes. A few notable internal changes would be a dual-core A5 processor, iOS 5 mobile operating system, the Siri voice recognition assistant, an 8MP camera and compatibility across GSM and CDMA networks.

Despite complaints from customers and investors, technical analysis company UBM TechInsights predicted that the iPhone 4S would provide healthy profit margins comparable to prior iPhone releases.

From the looks of it, they were right -- Apple announced that it topped one million iPhone 4S pre-orders within the first day of making pre-orders available.

"We are blown away with the incredible response to iPhone 4S," said Philip Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing. "The first day pre-orders for iPhone 4S have been the most for any new product that Apple has ever launched and we are thrilled that customers love iPhone 4S as much as we do."

What likely helped Apple out is the addition of Sprint as an iPhone carrier. It was discovered back in August that Sprint, for the first time, would sell the iPhone come the newest release in October. Not only that, but it would be the only carrier to offer unlimited plans for the iPhone 4 and iPhone 4S, giving it an edge over AT&T and Verizon.

IPhone 4S pre-orders began Friday, October 7. The iPhone 4S will be available October 14.

Source: Apple



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Wow..
By TakinYourPoints on 10/10/2011 7:01:15 PM , Rating: 2
A few weeks ago, someone on another forum I go to was discussing why iOS is used at his company and why Android isn't after being asked why they deploy iPads and none of the other tablets. I assume that the same issues apply to smartphones. This was also posted before the story around security in HTC handsets broke.

quote:
...we have to follow industry regulations and institutional policies around encryption of data at rest and mobile device management. Android is basically useless in a business setting because there has been almost no consideration given to most of these issues.

The fragmented nature of the Android device market means there's no central solution for it, either.

Even if the software met the requirements for securing a device, we would still have to narrow it down to one or two devices, because we can't certify or support the entire gamut. Thus, we use iPads.

The iPad is not used in enterprise because it's established, it's used because of the 39 or so ActiveSync security policies that can be applied to an ActiveSync compliant device, only iOS devices support them. Android supports around 7, and is essentially entirely useless for anything other than a casual device. It simply isn't possible right now to have a "secure" Android device, or even pretend you have one.

In addition, narrowing it down to one or two tablets is a LOT harder than you think. We were prepared to support the Galaxy Tab for a separate entity we have to support, but the lawsuits from Apple made us change our minds. Bottom line is no company except Apple has a real investment in the success of a tablet and its ecosystem. Google doesn't even come close for the reasons you mentioned.

Now if Google were to get into the tablet business, I think it'd be a total failure. They can't deliver a product that can last, because whatever they make will be immediately aped by another company looking to explore the market without making a substantial investment in it.

I hope none of my comments come across as discouraging competition, because that's not how I feel. I love competition and innovation in the sector, but the fact is after every other competitor shows their stuff off, the long-term stability and short-term supportability and security of iPads vastly outstrips other devices.


Taking this into consideration, it is clear why your company only authorizes Blackberry or iOS. That said, I have to assume that Windows Phone 7 adheres to the same ActiveSync security policies that iOS does, it is a Microsoft product after all. Does anyone here know about that? I have only seem iOS and Android in these kinds of discussions.


RE: Wow..
By Omega215D on 10/10/2011 9:18:10 PM , Rating: 2
The security issues with HTC seems to be pretty specific as to which models are affected. Sprint has the Motorola Xpert and Verizon the Droid Pro for business users and has security measures in place.

It would be good if Google began making their own business line up of Nexus phones.


"You can bet that Sony built a long-term business plan about being successful in Japan and that business plan is crumbling." -- Peter Moore, 24 hours before his Microsoft resignation














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki