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Print 37 comment(s) - last by Goty.. on Oct 6 at 5:38 PM

New phone is expected to be flagship Android 3.5 "Ice Cream Sandwich" phone

Apple, Inc. (AAPL) delivered an updated fifth generation iPhone dubbed the "iPhone 4S" yesterday.  Many felt the design underwhelmed.  The phone lacked full HSPA+, offering only offering HSDPA.  And the screen size and resolution remained unchanged.

Apple's decision not to upgrade the industry-leading Retina display seemed like a sound one given current products, but if a teaser from top Android-phonemaker Samsung Electronics Comp., Ltd. (SEO 005930) is any indication, it may be one that Apple comes to regret in months to come.

Samsung released a teaser video just 24 hours after Apple's big event bragging "something BIG is coming".  


The phone in that trailer may be the Nexus Prime, a Google, Inc. (GOOG) branded flagship smartphone.  With each generation of Android, Google handpicks a flagship model.  For Android 3.5 "Ice Cream Sandwich" -- the release the unifies the tablet and smartphone code trees -- Google appears (based on the logos slapped on the teaser video) to have selected a Samsung handset for the distinction, much to the surprise of some who expected it to pick a model produced by its subsidiary Motorola.

Such models -- e.g. the Nexus One -- haven't always done so well in sales. 

But the Nexus Prime could buck that trend.  This week Samsung unveiled in its home nation of South Korea the monstrous Galaxy S II HD LTE, complete with a 4.65-inch Super AMOLED handset with 1280 x 720 pixel resolution -- 50 percent more pixels than the iPhone 4S display.  The Nexus Prime is expected to get an LTE modem and a similar high-resolution screen.

It's possible the Nexus Prime is simply a rebranded and repackaged Galaxy S II HD LTE smartphone.  It's clear that at least some repackaging is afoot as the teaser shows a curved body, which indicates a curved glass overlay to the LCD and/or a curved LCD.  This is an interesting design move and could exempt Samsung's design from infringement claims by Apple.

Otherwise the video drops little in the way of clues about the phone's identity, showing only a power switch and three-pin docking connector.  

Samsung is currently fighting to ban the iPhone 4S in various regions and Apple is likely to return the favor with Samsung's next generation products like the Galaxy S II HD and Nexus Prime.

Sources: YouTube, Samsung



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Carriers
By KPOM1 on 10/5/2011 1:38:30 PM , Rating: 2
The Nexus Prime, from what little we know about it and can surmise from announced products, looks like it will be nice, particularly if it has a 4.65" 1280x768 display. What may ultimately determine how well it does is the carrier support, though. Nexus One bombed, while Nexus S did OK. If the rumors about Sprint are true, they bet their future on iPhone for the next 4 years, so while they might take the Nexus Prime, won't be promoting it heavily. T-Mobile is the last carrier without the iPhone, so hopefully for them it ships with HSPA+ on AWS. AT&T seems committed to iPhone. VZW is the most likely carrier to promote it, but they might want to customize it as a "Droid Prime" rather than ship a vanilla Ice Cream Sandwich (pun semi-intentional) phone.




RE: Carriers
By GuinnessKMF on 10/5/2011 3:03:16 PM , Rating: 2
how well it does... in the US. The US is a very large smartphone market but not the only one, and Samsung has shown they are perfectly happy to not deal with the US carriers on premiere phones (look how long it took for the Galaxy S II to reach our shores). I do agree with you that the fate of phones in the US market rely heavily on carrier promotion, because most people are smart enough to do their own research before just thinking "Oh boy, phone upgrade time, the verizon enemaizeratron is a phone I saw while watching my laugh track saturated sit coms".

The article also states 720, not 768. So it's a 16:9 format screen.


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