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Sprint CEO Dan Hesse   (Source: Mark Costantini/The Chronicle)
Sprint is reportedly committing to purchase 30.5m million iPhones over the next four years

All signs are pointing towards Sprint getting Apple's next generation iPhone, and the official announcement will come tomorrow during Tim Cook's keynote address. However, the price that Sprint will have to pay to join the iPhone brotherhood in the U.S. -- along with fellow wireless carriers AT&T and Verizon -- will be tremendous.
 
According to the Wall Street Journal, Sprint has agreed to buy 30.5 million iPhones over the next four years from Apple. The price tag for Sprint is a whopping $20 billion USD. Sprint will be subsidizing the cost of each on-contract phone to the tune of $500.
 
Another risk for the copmany is the fact that Sprint won't even make any money on the deal until at least 2014.
 
Sprint CEO Dan Hesse approached Sprint's Board of Directors with the deal, and they were understandably hesitant about betting the company on Apple's smartphone prowess. But in the end, the Board felt that it was fighting a losing battle against larger rivals Verizon and AT&T which both have the iPhone. In addition, if AT&T's planned acquisition of T-Mobile were to be approved, its fortunes in the marketplace would be even more dire.
 
The board eventually decided, "How can we pass this up? We have to have it."

With Sprint's commitment to making unlimited data a priority for its customers (at a time when Verizon and AT&T are putting bandwidth caps on users), such a deal could help bolster Sprint's survival chances in this cutthroat industry.
 
While Hesse and the Board are definitely onboard with the iPhone deal, investors are less thrilled. Sprint shares closed at $2.73, representing a 10.2 percent drop from the opening bell.

Sources: Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Google Finance



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RE: What, How, Why?
By priusone on 10/3/2011 5:13:07 PM , Rating: 1
Why? Because idiots like me love having a physical keyboard. Perhaps someone here can convince me to join the rest of the world and go keyboard-less. If only we were all the one and the same, just like what Apple wants.


RE: What, How, Why?
By Tony Swash on 10/3/11, Rating: -1
RE: What, How, Why?
By phatboye on 10/3/2011 7:12:48 PM , Rating: 3
A lot of phones have speech recognition software, even my old LG flip phone from 2005 had very crude speech speech recognition capabilities. This is nothing new and definitely nothing that is exclusive to Apple hardware as that video would like you to believe.


RE: What, How, Why?
By kmmatney on 10/3/2011 10:41:28 PM , Rating: 1
This will have speech recognition that doesn't suck - there's a big difference. Just like the iPhone was the first phone where browsing the internet didn't suck. Apple is often not the first with something, but they are often the first to do it right.


RE: What, How, Why?
By DeluxeTea on 10/3/2011 11:05:04 PM , Rating: 2
You are talking to the Swash. Everything is Apple exclusive for him, even the ones they copied.


RE: What, How, Why?
By Tony Swash on 10/4/2011 5:02:01 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
A lot of phones have speech recognition software, even my old LG flip phone from 2005 had very crude speech speech recognition capabilities. This is nothing new and definitely nothing that is exclusive to Apple hardware as that video would like you to believe.


Clearly you didn't read the article in the link, which is a shame because its quite interesting. Siri uses speech recognition but is not speech recognition, it's use of speech recognition is a sort of plugin and can swapped in and out depending on whats the best solution (it seems Apple is probably going with Nuance). Siri is AI. It was the product of a five year US government funded and large scale research project to build am AI system. Apple bought it.

quote:
In 2003, the US Government began the most ambitious Artificial Intelligence program in its history called the “Cognitive Assistant that Learns and Organizes” or CALO program. The name was inspired by the Latin word “calonis”, which means “soldier’s servant”. Funded by DARPA as part of its Personal Assistant that Learns project, the program ran for five years and brought together more than 300 researchers from 25 of the top university and commercial research institutions, with the goal of “building a new generation of cognitive assistants that can reason, learn from experience, be told what to do, explain what they are doing, reflect on their experience, and respond robustly to surprise.”

The program was coordinated through SRI International in Menlo Park, CA. As the program ended in 2007, SRI took the knowledge gained by the CALO and some of its key players and formed Siri.


Looks interesting doesn't it?


RE: What, How, Why?
By StevoLincolnite on 10/4/2011 8:17:30 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
A lot of phones have speech recognition software, even my old LG flip phone from 2005 had very crude speech speech recognition capabilities.


Yep. My Samsung SCH-p-207 had speech to text and voice dialing back in 2005.

Also had a Nokia 3310 back in 2000 which allowed for voice dialing to.

Voice recognition is an OLD technology dating back to the 1950's.

I hope Apple do it right. One thing I like Apple for is pushing other companies to improve because of the added competition. (Who leave them in the dust eventually.)


"If you can find a PS3 anywhere in North America that's been on shelves for more than five minutes, I'll give you 1,200 bucks for it." -- SCEA President Jack Tretton














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