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Tesla Model S Beta  (Source: Tesla Motors)
“That’s quicker than a [Porsche] 911 [Carrera]" -- Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk

Tesla Motors has already proved that it can produce a credible electric vehicle thanks to its Roadster and Roadster Sport. The company is now putting the finishing touches on its Model S electric sedan, which is currently in beta testing.
 
The 2012 Model S will be available in three trim levels, delivering a driving range of 160 miles, 230 miles, and 300 miles respectively. Now, according to Green Car Reports, a "performance" version of the Model S will join the fleet to appease those that require a bit more "grunt" from their vehicles.
 
While the standard Model S can reach 60 mph in 5.6 seconds (a time that is quite respectable in its own right), the performance model will do the deed in less than 4.5 seconds. There is no word yet on what the driving range will be for the performance model.
 
While getting more performance out of the Model S is more than believable, Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk may be teetering on the realm of believability with this next claim:
 
We’re also going to be offering aerodynamic wheels that will enable 320 mile range. There were some skeptics who said we couldn’t do a 300 mile range, but we’re going to do better than that. We’re going to offer 320 mile range, as tested on the EPA 2 cycle test.
 
A bonus 20 miles of range from just changing the wheels seems a bit unlikely, but we'll give Musk the benefit of the doubt on this one.

Below is a test drive video of the Tesla Model S during the first public unveil of the beta model.

Sources: Green Car Reports, Left Lane News, Ken W. Edwards



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By FredEx on 10/3/2011 4:22:02 AM , Rating: 2
You keep getting on it and they suck that gas up pretty damn quickly. Put another $50.00 in and go for it again.


By theapparition on 10/3/2011 9:05:23 AM , Rating: 2
Yeah, but that $50.00 only takes a few minutes to put in the car, rather than sitting next to a charging station for the next 8hrs.

Hope you have lots of reading material.


By mcnabney on 10/3/2011 10:22:31 AM , Rating: 2
Actually, quick charging can 'fill' a battery to about 85% capacity in around a half hour. Topping-off takes a lot longer. I don't think we have gotten to the age of depending on an electric for all our needs. Road trips are complicated with an EV, however since most households have TWO cars I don't see a huge problem making the commuter car an EV and keeping a minivan for longer trips.


By theapparition on 10/3/2011 11:57:43 AM , Rating: 2
That's only for dedicated places with quick charge facilities. For standard 110V service, it takes far longer.


By mcnabney on 10/3/2011 12:51:31 PM , Rating: 1
Those quick-chargers are popping-up all over. Last time I was in SF I saw the damn things all over. Once California stops hogging all of the EVs we will see chargers becoming more commonplace.

Hell, what if every McDonalds put one in? Stop, get a coffee and fries while the car fills up. Going EV has trade-offs. One of the benefits is not sending money to the people that want to kill us.


By theapparition on 10/3/2011 2:40:58 PM , Rating: 2
Less than 20% of our oil money goes to the mid-east. But even if we cut them off tomorrow, they'll just sell it all to China, and be even more pissed off at us because we won't buy thier oil anymore.

Think they are mad because of religion, try being mad because of money.


By Keeir on 10/3/2011 5:55:57 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Less than 20% of our oil money goes to the mid-east.


Thats not really entirely an accurate way to look at this situation.

The question is where does the marginal reduction go? If I comsume 1 less barrel of oil, does the US, Canada, or Middle East take the hit? Due to the large distances involved, I would think its the Middle East.


By theapparition on 10/3/2011 11:23:35 PM , Rating: 2
But my point is quite clear. They will sell to other countries. China in particular heavily imports from the mid-east. There are plenty other countries that are using more and more oil resorces.

I'm not advocating getting away from petroleum, just the fallacy that our money is all going to terrorists who want us dead.


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