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Prius v

Prius Plug-in Hybrid
Toyota's newest hybrids get priced

We've talked about the Prius Plug-in Hybrid and the Prius v on a number of occasions here on DailyTech. Now, we have official pricing for both of the new hybrids.

The Prius v will start at $27,140 when it launches in the U.S. this fall. The Prius v uses the same hybrid powertrain as the standard Prius, but has a larger cargo area behind the rear seats (34.3 cu ft versus 21.6 cu ft). The Prius v weighs 200 pounds more than the standard Prius, so fuel economy suffers. Combined fuel economy for the Prius v is 40mpg instead of the loftier 50mpg for the regular Prius.

The Prius Plug-in Hybrid will be priced from $32,760. The new lithium-ion battery pack in the plug-in variant allows the vehicle to travel up to 15 miles on battery power alone (at speeds up to 62mph). After the 15 miles is exhausted, Prius Plug-in Hybrid will operate exactly like any other Prius hybrid. 

Toyota says that the Prius Plug-in Hybrid can be charged in 1.5 hours using a 240V outlet or 2 to 3 hours using a 120V outlet. 

The Prius Plug-in Hybrid also qualifies for a $2,500 federal tax credit.



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RE: Disappointed
By Samus on 9/18/2011 3:29:22 AM , Rating: 0
I am really tires of the "Toyota Made in America" crap people keep listening to on Fox News.

Toyota has 117,000 North American employees and Ford has 99,000 North American employees. Both have assembly plants in Mexico and Canada. That is irrelevent.

The difference is Ford has 45,000 UAW employees and 54,000 non-union. ALL of Toyota's employees are non-Union, and some positions pay substantially better than the equivilent position at Ford.

The point of all of this is, Toyota has 40% more marketshare than Ford in North America, but only has 20% more employees. So unless they're assembling cars over 20% faster...hint: they're not, Ford's assembly line has been the most efficient in the world based on assemembly time of class-sized since 2007...then Toyota is obviously importing a decent number of cars that can be safely assumed to have majority foreign (to N. America) materials.

The Prius wasn't even assembled here until 2007.

Whats important to note here is final assembly, not where the parts come from. Sure, a lot of Ford parts come from Europe (I sure as hell know half my SVT Focus comes from Germany, the UK, Spain and Poland) but in contrast to Toyota, a lot of the parts come from...China. Batteries, motors, electronics, lighting, seats. All made in China.

Ford hybrid batteries come from Michigan, their motors come from Missouri, most seats are upholstered in Kentucky, and their hybrid transmissions come from the same Japanesse company that Toyota sources their hybrid synergy drivetrain from (all assembled in Japan.)

The point is total jobs. Since most of the high-end Toyota parts come from Japan and China, even though they only make up 10-20% of the vehicles build of materials, they are the most profitable materials on the bill and thats where the money is.

Toyota buying their aluminum, steel and plastics here pail in profit comparison to Ford buying their batteries, motors, engines, upholstry, and electronics here.


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