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FX CPU ran at 8.429 GHz with liquid nitrogen cooling

AMD has been content to let Intel offer the pricier and often faster processors to the enthusiast desktop crowd for a while now while AMD focused on the lower price crown. In fact, the company’s value-oriented Fusion processor has been a great performer for the company.

Today, however, AMD announced that its FX 8-core desktop CPU has grabbed a Guinness World Record for the highest frequency for a computer processor to date. The processor was able to run at 8.429 GHz, beating the previous record of 8.309GHz.

The team had to resort to some extreme measures to cool the processor enough to hit that record-breaking frequency. Air or water-cooling was out and Team AMD FX had to resort to liquid nitrogen for cooling. The team included some overclocking gurus along with AMD folks in the effort. 

The clock speed of the processor was validated using CPU-Z and will go into the record book. Although AMD was able to overclock the FX CPU to "well above 5GHz" using air or liquid cooling systems that cost under $100, the team used a three-phase system to make its record run.

 “The record-breaking processor speed that resides in the AMD FX CPU clearly demonstrates performance gains for the new AMD Bulldozer multi-core architecture, which will provide x86 computing power for this CPU and future AMD Accelerated Processing Units,” said Chris Cloran, corporate vice president and general manager, Client Group at AMD. “Along with world-record frequencies, the AMD FX processor will enable an unrivaled enthusiast PC experience for the money – extreme multi-display gaming, mega-tasking and HD content creation.”

AMD has a video posted that shows the overclocking process and the record run.



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RE: False
By kattanna on 9/13/2011 2:06:40 PM , Rating: 2
the LN2 cooling, while impressive, is that a stunt.

but what really interested me from the video was how it was running above 5Ghz with "aggressive" air and stock water cooling, and running under load.

now that was impressive.


RE: False
By Reclaimer77 on 9/13/2011 2:15:50 PM , Rating: 1
I have to wonder if AMD is becoming the new 1990's Pentium 4? Their architecture can't really compete with Sandy Bridge, so they're jacking up the clocks to compensate?

I would rather they spent the time doing this overclock on benchmarking the chip instead. At least then we would have some kind of idea of what this thing can really do with those clocks.


RE: False
By adiposity on 9/13/2011 2:34:01 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I have to wonder if AMD is becoming the new 1990's Pentium 4? Their architecture can't really compete with Sandy Bridge, so they're jacking up the clocks to compensate?


I was under the impression Netburst was designed to have high clock speed from the beginning. They deliberately lengthened the pipeline so they could get higher clocks with less performance per clock.


RE: False
By silverblue on 9/14/2011 2:20:51 PM , Rating: 2
...and throughout the P4's life, they enhanced the chip with a faster FSB, more cache, HT and some other tweaks to ensure performance scaled linearly. I saw some graphs on the Anandtech XP3000+ review the other day which nicely demonstrates a) how P4 was scaling along with the IPC boost shown when Northwood came out, and b) that the Athlon XP was running out of legs. Still, P4 was far too hungry and hot.


RE: False
By FaceMaster on 9/13/2011 5:26:50 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I have to wonder if AMD is becoming the new 1990's Pentium 4? Their architecture can't really compete with Sandy Bridge, so they're jacking up the clocks to compensate?


Then again, their 'lower speed, lower price' policy has worked brilliantly in the graphics card industry. I guess you could look at their increased number of cores and higher clocks as the brute-force approach, but it could also be a simple case of finding a different solution to a problem. If it ends up being comparable with Intel's CPUs, I see no problem with the method. Especially if it means that you get the choice between good gaming chips, and those that are more suited to video editing and the like.

Just as long as they are competitive with Intel.


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