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Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7
Samsung gets hit over the head again by Apple and a German court

Remember that striking new Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7 that was unveiled just a few days ago at the IFA consumer electronics show in Berlin, Germany? Well, Samsung has already pulled the promotional material and prototypes off the show floor.

SlashGear first noticed this yesterday, and a spokesman for Samsung simply stated, "Samsung has removed the Galaxy Tab 7.7 from our stand at IFA. We cannot make any further comment as we have not received an official statement from the court.” 

Bloomberg confirmed that a Dusseldorf court on Friday granted Apple's request to add the Galaxy Tab 7.7 to the list of banned Samsung devices in Germany. As a result, Samsung is forbidden from selling or marketing the Galaxy Tab 7.7 in that country.

“Samsung respects the court’s decision,” said Samsung spokesman James Chung to Bloomberg. He went on to add that Apple's actions in this matter “severely limits consumer choice in Germany.” 

As its name implies, the Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7 features a 7.7" Super AMOLED display with a 1280x800 resolution. The tablet also packs a 5,100 mAh battery, 1.4GHz dual-core processor, up to 64GB of storage, microSD slot, 802.11n, Bluetooth 3.0, rear- and front-facing cameras, and GPS. 

A court injunction in early August weighed heavily in Apple's favor, as it banned all sales and marketing of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 in the European Union. That ruling was largely scaled back, however, and was limited to just Germany (the Dusseldorf court did not have the authority to expand it's ban hammer to other entities in the European Union).

Outside of the European Union, Apple has also succeeded in preventing the sales and marketing of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 in Australia. Samsung later decided to give up fighting the injunction and will instead wait until a final ruling is handled down on September 26 regarding its fate in the country. 

Apple is on the warpath when it comes to protecting the sales of its cash cow iPad. Using rather "diplomatic" language, the Cupertino, California-based company in an April lawsuit chided Samsung; "Rather than innovate and develop its own technology and a unique Samsung style for its smartphone products and computer tablets, Samsung chose to copy Apple's technology, user interface and innovative style in these infringing products."

Apple delivered an even more snarky statement to journalist Ina Fried expressing its frustration with Samsung's "copy machine". "It’s no coincidence that Samsung’s latest products look a lot like the iPhone and iPad, from the shape of the hardware to the user interface and even the packaging. This kind of blatant copying is wrong, and we need to protect Apple’s intellectual property when companies steal our ideas.”



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RE: Three things....
By SilthDraeth on 9/4/2011 1:25:54 PM , Rating: 2
Wouldn't the asus transformer be more of a replacement for the laptop?

Though I really don't know if there are common android bluetooth print drivers that work on hp and other bluetooth capable printers.

Or over WiFi.

Also, haven't installed any office program on my Epic, as there really isn't a need.

If I were to buy any tablet though, it would be the Transformer.


RE: Three things....
By mattscottshea on 9/5/2011 10:56:29 AM , Rating: 2
I feel ASUS has the right idea moving forward to keep Tablets relevant. The transformer and the slider offer superior overall functionality than other tablets thanks to their keyboards (in the Transformers case, a trackpad, more battery life, and full usb/sd ports). And when Win8 comes out, these designs may prove to be a deciding factor in peoples purchases. Now if only they can squeeze in a thin blu-ray drive.


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